Tag Archives: barley

Orange-Banana Bread with Dark Chocolate and a Pecan Crust

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c whole wheat flour
  • 1 c Bob’s Red Mill 5 grain rolled hot cereal
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2.25 cups mashed overripe bananas
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 3 tbsp ground flax
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 c crushed pecan halves
  • 1/2-2/3 c dark chocolate chips
  • 5 drops doTerra® wild orange essential oil

chocolate_orangeYou know those chocolate oranges you find all over the place during the holidays — the ones that give you a delicious reason during times of culturally heightened stresses to hit something other than a coworker/friend/uncle/stranger/wall? That kind of holiday spirit is the inspiration, without the insinuation of violence, for these little loaves.

To make the batter, start out by putting all of your dry ingredients in a bowlobbread
together and putting in another bowl the butter and brown sugar. Cream those latter two, then add the mashed bananas; mix. Add the beaten egg; mix. Fold in the dry ingredients and chocolate chips. For a final touch, carefully drop wild orange oil in carefully, tasting after each until your orangey desires are met. Pour into whatever size loaf pans you’d like and crunch pecan halves over the top, pressing pecans gently into the wet mix. Bake at 350° for an hour, or until an inserted butter knife comes out clean. I combat the guilt of a stick of butter with the knowledge that I’m also feeding people I love whole wheat flour, whole grain oats, barley, rye, double flax and triticale (absolutely none of which you can taste over the banana, orange, chocolate and pecans). 5 spoons!

 

Cooking for Dogs

In my pantry today:

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 c eggshells
  • 1/4 c buckwheat, uncooked
  • 1 c barley, uncooked
  • 4 c rice, cooked
  • 1/3 c ground flax
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste (optional)

Dog food is expensive, and lordy knows the canned stuff dogs love is filled with loads of unhealthy nonsense. That little voice in my inner ears (it lives beside the tinnitus) can’t let me keep stuffing them full of it. We’re not ready to make the “kids” go cold turkey on all store-bought food, so the dry food will stay (I use quotation marks because there is a succinct difference between animals and human children — in case you were unclear or suspected that I might be). In place of the wet food (I also hate opening cans because it is difficult), we did a little preliminary research and married what of it we could with our pantry. We had to buy the ground meat, but everything else was right here.

Combine dry buckwheat and barley — cook together in 2c water with turmeric, cinnamon and garlic paste. Completely cook ground turkey, and add egg shells when it’s browned. Mix. Add rice and pot of seasoned barley/buckwheat to large pot where your meat lives. Stir together and refrigerate contents for the upcoming week. We’ve got two dogs at 25/80lbs, respectively… the goal is to make enough food that weekly wet food costs will negate themselves. Until and beyond then, however, dog food will not get a spoon rating (sorry, Emeril!).

Cowboy is a boy. And a French Maid.

This recipe will yield about 10c of dog nom… now we just need to pray that they’ll eat it. This shouldn’t be a terribly risky proposition, but my pretty, pretty princess decided suddenly to hate eggs when we began hard boiling those instead of opening cans… he has eaten with no problem all of (but not limited to) these things:

  • cat poop
  • an entire bag of Ghirardelli dark chocolate squares
  • watermelon
  • carrots
  • an entire jar of Vaseline

Nobody would’ve considered Cowboy the alpha of the house but Sadie followed suit within a day, urging us (upon seeing the what a soft boiled egg turns into the next morning when allowed to fester overnight) to make the necessary changes for both their palette and our pantry. Fingers’ crossed for tonight’s meal.

—–UPDATE—————————

Yeah, they both loved it like a fat kid loves cake.

 

Lazarus Carrots (or, “Not Just Noses for Snowmen”)

In my pantry today:

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 gloves garlic
  • 1 small Vidalia onion
  • 6 carrots (2.5 c ground)
  • 1 tbsp mustard seed
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp cardamom
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/4 c ground flax
  • 2 14.5 oz can vegetable broth
  • .5 c water
  • 1.5 c cooked Basmati rice
  • .5 c cooked barley

I’ve been intending to roast all of those gorgeous carrots from my CSA with potatoes and onions and such… but at 3 weeks of good intentions, I am paving the road to hell with now-wilty carrots. I must put them to some manner of delicious use… perhaps by shoving their diced asses into the food processor: the phoenix-maker of iffy food!

While your carrots process to a nice mincemeat, start your onion, garlic and mustard seeds out in the coconut oil in a cold pan warming to M. When the mustard seeds begin popping, mix in turmeric and remove from heat. Transfer carrots from the food processor to a bowl and mix in flax; set aside. Pour cooled-ish pan contents into the processor and puree until a sauce-ish consistency. Put back in pan (now on ML) and stir in carrot/flax mixture and the remainder of your seasonings with 1 c water and bring to a low boil. Transfer immediately to the food processor and smoosh it all together one last time.

Transfer back to pan and slowly mix in 1/2 can of broth. Bring to an easy boil on ML for 10-15m. Mix in dal and another 1/2 can of broth and bring it all to a low boil on M. Let boil uncovered on M for 20-30 minutes, adding more broth in stages when it seems your sauce is becoming dangerously thick. Give your cooked rice and barley a proper introduction and serve underneath a sauce fit for a king. The sweetness of the carrots is heartened by that of the vidalia and the savory garlic and garam masala. Even wilty carrots can be made delectable with the right care — 5 spoons!

Barley Bride all in White (or, “Flavor for Fatigue”)

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c barley, uncooked
  • 1 c frozen(-from fresh) spinach
  • 3/4 c ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 c shredded mozzerella
  • 1/4 c Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 4-6 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 medium Vidalia onion
  • 4 leaves basil
  • 2 tbsp Greek seasoning
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida

So I’ve hit my head pretty hard at least five times this week from my own dysmetric clumsiness, the piece de resistance having happened last night with a hammock. Were video to have been taken, I would be wildly viral right now; instead I have to be the person who nobody witnessed being flipped upside down like a bad carnival ride. This morning the headache remained, along with blurry vision most likely due to a little trauma to my occipital lobe… but other than that I meet no criteria for a true concussion. Regardless, still gotta eat, right?

This will be a nice single-dish meal for the confused and lethargic amongst us. The barley experiment from a day or two ago was both the flavor and ease inspiration. Start the event with mincing your garlic and onion as finely as possible and throw them in an oiled pot warming to M; once it reaches full temp reduce to ML and let simmer. Mix water with turmeric and 1.75 tbsp of Greek seasoning, mix in uncooked barley and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to L and walk away for 15m. In that little window, mince spinach and basil as finely as possible and add to the oil when onions look translucent. Mix well and let that simmer for another 15m. When the barley is a moment from completion, take from heat and add ricotta cheese. Stir until a creamy sauce tenderly holds each pearl of barley. Top with mozzerella and Parmesan, then cover the pot and return it to your off burner until the cheeses melt. 4 spoons!

Double Feature: Basil, Beets and Barley (or, “Wait, That’s Three Things.”)

In my pantry today:

  • 5 small beets, baked and peeled
  • 3 c cooked barley
  • 1 c goat cheese
  • 2 large cloves garlic
  • 1 c fresh basil
  • 1 c fresh spinach
  • 1/2 c radish microgreens
  • 1 tbsp salted butter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 6-8 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 small Vidalia onion

I think I’m finally getting the hang of our CSA weekly bundles. I’ve got four days until the next pickup and only 1 tomato, 1 head of kale, 5 beets and 7 carrots left before Tuesday. This is a vast improvement over weeks prior, and I’ve yet to determine if this pace has worked. Check back after Tuesday.

I’ve also been hemming and hawing about the beets a little — they’re a new and foreign element to my kitchen, but I remind myself that that is not their fault. They may be the poor and huddled masses in my crisper drawer now, but social justice will catch up… hopefully riding the iron horse of deliciousness. I apparently made a 5 spoon issue out of it yesterday, sources report. Mince 4-6 (depending on size, y’know) cloves of garlic and 1/2 c basil in as teeny-tiny flakes as possible. Cream it with 1/2 c goat cheese and apply in neat balls to the top of chilled beet slices. I salt roasted these beets day before yesterday — cut off and reserve the greens, scrub the roots and place in a glass baking dish with a 1/2″ of salt in the bottom. Cover the dish and bake at 425° for 45 minutes to an hour. Let cool, peel and refrigerate for future beet use.

While you’ve got the garlic-mincing going, go ahead and dice up 2-4 cloves and 1/2 a Vidalia onion. Start your butter and oil warming to M in a cold pan with the garlic and onion. Once it reaches full heat, reduce to L and let cook for 15m or so — until your garlic crisps to golden brown and your onions are near caramelization. Using a slotted spatula or spoon, remove the crispy garlic and sweet onion; set aside. Return heat to M and mix in your barley. Once it’s well-coated, add your mixture of spinach, chopped basil and microgreens. Toss until the spinach becomes bright green, then add back the garlic and onion and continue mixing with a pinch or two of sea salt. When everything is warm together, add dollops of goat cheese and cover the pan. Serve in 5m. The onions will deliver sweet bites in the midst of garlic’s tasty reign, and goat cheese will apply a creamy reasoning to the entire argument. 5 spoons.