Tag Archives: basmati rice

Moong-day, Moong-day (ft. Nutty Cabbage)

In my pantry today:

  • 1/2 medium cabbage
  • 1/3 c moong dal
  • 1/3 c dry roasted peanuts
  • 1 c Basmati rice, cooked/cold
  • 1 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 3 c vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tbsp hot curry powder 
  • 1 pinch asafoetida

peanutcabbage

I’ve got to come clean about something.

I really like cabbage.

Cannot lie. Like it, prefer it even over other vegetables. This all came to pass long before I understood its health benefits beyond not being cake. Want to improve your health but can’t afford another prescription? Eat cruciferous vegetables. That being said…

Start the ghee out on ML and when melted add the onion. Cook over ML heat for 10m or so then toss in the raw cabbage. Turn up heat to MH and stir fry for a minute or two; add 1/2 c of broth and cover. Continue letting steam over M heat for another 10 minutes. Remove lid and stir in seasonings, peanuts. Bring back to a boil and stir in moong with remainder of broth. Bring back to a boil and let cook on M until moong is tender (20-30m) and most of the liquid is gone. Remove from heat and toss in cold rice. Put back on ML heat and toss until everything is hot. Maybe this looks like it takes forever, but there were a lot of dishes to wash ‘n junk and it seemed to take no time at all (and precious little effort). As a combined nut lover and one who loves cabbage done its due, I give this 5 spoons!

Lazarus Carrots (or, “Not Just Noses for Snowmen”)

In my pantry today:

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 gloves garlic
  • 1 small Vidalia onion
  • 6 carrots (2.5 c ground)
  • 1 tbsp mustard seed
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp cardamom
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/4 c ground flax
  • 2 14.5 oz can vegetable broth
  • .5 c water
  • 1.5 c cooked Basmati rice
  • .5 c cooked barley

I’ve been intending to roast all of those gorgeous carrots from my CSA with potatoes and onions and such… but at 3 weeks of good intentions, I am paving the road to hell with now-wilty carrots. I must put them to some manner of delicious use… perhaps by shoving their diced asses into the food processor: the phoenix-maker of iffy food!

While your carrots process to a nice mincemeat, start your onion, garlic and mustard seeds out in the coconut oil in a cold pan warming to M. When the mustard seeds begin popping, mix in turmeric and remove from heat. Transfer carrots from the food processor to a bowl and mix in flax; set aside. Pour cooled-ish pan contents into the processor and puree until a sauce-ish consistency. Put back in pan (now on ML) and stir in carrot/flax mixture and the remainder of your seasonings with 1 c water and bring to a low boil. Transfer immediately to the food processor and smoosh it all together one last time.

Transfer back to pan and slowly mix in 1/2 can of broth. Bring to an easy boil on ML for 10-15m. Mix in dal and another 1/2 can of broth and bring it all to a low boil on M. Let boil uncovered on M for 20-30 minutes, adding more broth in stages when it seems your sauce is becoming dangerously thick. Give your cooked rice and barley a proper introduction and serve underneath a sauce fit for a king. The sweetness of the carrots is heartened by that of the vidalia and the savory garlic and garam masala. Even wilty carrots can be made delectable with the right care — 5 spoons!

Beanie-ahini (Now With Entire Tree Limbs!)

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c cooked white beans
  • 1/2 orange bell pepper
  • 1 leaf of kale, minced
  • 1/2 onion
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 packets Swanson® Flavor Boost™ (Vegetable)
  • 2 tbsp tahini
  • 1/2 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 2 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 2 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 1 spring dried rosemary, ripped mercilessly from its home in a public median
  • 1 c uncooked Basmati rice

I felt like dicing things up into tiny slivers today, and I made it so to the best of my ability. Put your meticulously slivered garlic in your giant pan with the olive oil and turn the cold burner to M. As it warms, dice and add onion and stir. Let that cook for about five minutes (or until sizzling sounds begin to happen) while you dice your pepper. Add and toss everything with turmeric until bright yellow seeps across the stainless steel surface. Add 1 tbsp water when/if pan begins to dry out to buy time while you pick up that bundle of kale you just brought home and regard it thoughtfully. End up choosing only a single stalk and dicing the leaves — it has been decided that this dish is more about the tahini than the kale, and it must be approached carefully so as not to allow kale the spotlight.

So just sprinkle in that minced leaf as visual interest, stir. Fold in the white beans with your other seasonings as well as the trademarked Flavor Boost™ before adding in tahini a tbsp at a time. Thin out the sauce with a little unsweetened almond milk and, upon satisfactory meld, top with spring of dried rosemary and cover. Let cook on L for a couple hours for best results, then serve over Basmati rice. 4 spoons!

Bacon Black Bean Blitzkrieg! (Now With Spoons!)

In my pantry today:

  • 1.5 c cooked black beans
  • 3 slices thick-cut bacon
  • 1/2 clove of garlic, skinned
  • 1/2 c water
  • 1 tbsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt (or more to taste)
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 c cooked Basmati rice

First thing’s first: Cut your three slices of bacon in half and start them off in a cold pan warming to MH. While that’s happening, crush your garlic cloves into chunks, and when the bacon is sizzling and ready for its first fork-flip add the garlic to the pan. I recommend, from learning the hard way, not to scatter it all around the pan. Keep the garlic isolated for easy removal in a few minutes when it becomes golden brown and crispy around the edges. Set aside for later garnishing.

Once the bacon begins to brown, cut it (either in the pan or taken out for a quick second) into inch long pieces and let finish browning until you are satisfied with the color (everyone’s got a different bacon barometer here). I let it cook until about 70% crispy. Drain out 1/4 c of the grease and reserve for future cookings. Add the black beans and pepper and gently toss until everything becomes one. Add water, salt and asafoetida then cover upon slow boil and reduce heat to ML. Let cook until more paste-like than water, then serve over rice with a fried garlic garnish.

With this recipe I am going to begin rating the success and deliciousness of each recipe I post from here on out using spoons. I give this eatsperiment 4 of 5 spoons. Spoons, you see, in an homage to Christine Miserandino’s Spoon Theory. It has become so much more widely known than it was when I discovered it a few years ago. I was desperate to find a way to explain my invisible limitations to others, and this story gave me, and countless others of all chronic illnesses, that ability. Imagine me now endcapping this article with a Braveheart-style spoon-thrust into the air.

 

And also because spoons, y’know, are in your kitchen ‘n junk.

Garleeky Black Beans

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c cooked black beans
  • 1 leek
  • 2/3 head fresh garlic
  • 1/3 c safflower oil
  • 4 roma tomatoes, diced
  • 1 c water
  • 1 packet of Vegetable Broth concentrate (or a bullion cube)
  • 2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/2 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp cardamon
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • Basmati rice

First, thinly slice the bulb off your leek and crush/mince your garlic. Add to safflower oil and turn heat to M. Let them cook together in a deep frying pan for 10m. Add your tomatoes in fist-fulls, squeezing each fist ‘o ‘maters ever so gently over their bowl to weed out extraneous tomato snot. Fold the tomatoes into the garleek mixture, pressing them down with a spatula after they’re completely coated with oil. The stove should remain on M so that everything in the pan is in a constant state of agitation.

Add your spices — put in the turmeric first just to enjoy the bright and cheery color change your dish will have for just a moment. Then add your packet of omavegetable bullion and c of water. Stir with emphasis on flattening your tomatoes, for when the beans come into the picture there will be no more fruit-smashing. And when you feel you have smashed enough, fold in the beans and stir. Let it all boil down together into a slightly less watery nonsense, then reduce heat to L with a lid and let it ruminate for an hour. Serve serve over rice.

Three Animals and a Vegetarian Walk Into a Bar…

In my pantry today:

  • 1.5 c leftover cabbage
  • 1 can vegetable broth
  • 1 can chicken broth
  • 1 packet brown gravy mix
  • 1 tbsp. corn starch
  • 1 c. sliced raw spinach
  • 1 small carrot, poorly but thinly sliced
  • 2 c cooked Basmati rice

So there’s probably some cabbage leftover from last night’s jaunt down Stovetop Highway. Put it back on the stove, then pause and take a thoughtful moment for yourself. You deserve it.

While the pot is still cold (but warming to H) throw in your second six above ingredients. Stir until it is a murky brown mess, and bring it to a boil while not failing to stir regularly. Once the bubbles begin to appear, reduce heat to ML and let simmer until the carrots are at your preferred crunchsistency. Serve over rice while pondering how a pig, chicken and cow can get along so well with a can of vegetable broth. You might feel a twinge of animal gluttony shame, but this will taste enough like beef stew on a cold evening to negate any moral or ethical concerns.

Hot Oinking Limas with Kale

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c soaked extra large lima beans
  • 2 c raw kale
  • 2 tbsp reserved sausage grease
  • 1 c dry basmati rice
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced clumsily
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1/2 tbsp mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 c water
  • 4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 2 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper

Rinse your overnight-soaked lima beans and start them to boiling. Start out on H and reduce heat, upon rolling boil, to M to let them simmer until done. Start your rice to soakin while you’re at it, then clumsily dice up an onion. In a large stockpot (I like using these whenever multiple ingredients are involved for I am irrepressibly graceless — please feel free to use a deep saucepan if you want to be, y’know, cheffy about it), get your sausage globs from the fridge melting. Add onion and mustard seeds, cook on M for a few minutes then reduce heat to L and add garlic and 2 tsp cayenne. Mix well then let mingle while you de-stem your kale.

Put oregano, turmeric, asafoetida, salt and 2 tsp cayenne in a measuring cup then fill with water to the 1/2 c line, stir and set aside.

Now it should be about time to cook the rice, so do that. When the lima beans aren’t shameful to your mouth, drain and set aside. Turn heat back up to MH on the stock pot. When it’s sizzlin real good, toss in the kale, sear it, then add the lima beans and toss. Pour in the 1/2 c seasoned water, then cover the pot and reduce to L. Let it all sit on L for at least 5m. Serve over Basmati rice.

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day, or “But her nuts!”

In my pantry today:

  • 2  c butternut squash in 1/4″ cubes
  • 2 tbsp unsweetened cashew butter
  • 1 16oz can chicken broth
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp+ cayenne pepper
  • 2 c cooked Basmati rice

Cook onion slivers in olive oil on M until they begin to become translucent; mix a tiny pinch of cayenne pepper in. Add squash and garlic. Cook pan contents for about a minute, then add 2 tbsp broth and cover the pan. In about another two minutes, remove pan contents from heat and set aside in a bowl. In hot-n-empty pan, begin sliding your hunk of cashew butter around. As it melts, slowly add broth and continue stirring patiently until there’s a rich gravy. Once the cashew butter is entirely dissolved into a delicious sauce, add back the butternut squash and rest of your cayenne pepper. Stir. Cover and let continue cooking on L until the squash is tooth-tender. Serve over rice and enjoy the hearty, spicy goodness while contemplating the beauty of that forecast thunderstorm.

Color Theory Cooking

In my pantry today:

  • 1 head kale
  • 1 head red cabbage
  • 1 c dried moong dal
  • 1 small onion
  • 1/2 c water
  • 1 16oz can petite diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic-ginger paste
  • 2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp yellow curry
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 small dried red chili pepper

This will end up being a lot less visually attractive than when it starts, but isn’t that the case with much of life anyhow? At least, here, today, it will a visual let down apologized for by great taste and nutrient fever.*

Grab a stock pot and in it put your oil, onion and mustard seeds; let that cook on M for 10-15m. That’s plenty of time to chop up your head of cabbage and to de-vein your kale. When the onions begin to brown or mustard seeds begin popping (whichever comes first) add your cabbage. Stir to coat and let cook for 5m before adding in your kale. Stir, add water, cover, reduce heat to ML. Start your moong dal to boiling. Look through your cupboards for inspiration on what to do next. Pull out a can of tomatoes and all the aforementioned seasoning devices.

After the cabbakale is a little languid and more reasonable to open discussion, add the ginger-garlic paste and garlic powder. Stir thoroughly. Add tomatoes and remainder of your seasonings (except the dried red pepper) then stir and let sit until the dal is ready.
I didn’t need to drain the beans — they cooked in a small pot and absorbed all the water into a near-oatmealesque texture which worked well with the waterier texture of the stock pot contents. Combine dal and kalbbage, crush up dried pepper and sprinkle into the two as you merge them faithfully into one. Serve over that Basmati rice you had time to make yesterday.

 

 

*”Nutrient Fever” isn’t really a thing.

Thank You, Bacon Grease

In my pantry today:

  • 2 tbsp reserved bacon grease
  • 4c cooked, sliced/cubed sweet potato
  • 4c cooked lima beans
  • 1 leek
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • .5 tbsp salt
  • 1.5 c chicken broth
  • Basmati rice

Your dinner will owe its life to that reserved bacon grease.

So start out with a great idea. I imagined a delightful meal of various colors and textures; not another pot of mush, y’know? Start your sliced leek out in the bacon grease at M. Realize that not only are your sweet potatoes overcooked, but holy crapballs so are the shouldn’t-be-at-a-rolling-boil lima beans. This is why — one reason of I am certain many — not to self-engineer a double boiler while something is cooking under the melting chocolate. Sigh and mix the beans into the pan.

Carefully fold in the sweet potatoes. Add garlic and salt. Let it continue cooking on L for a solid 20m. In that time, embrace the mush as just as valid as the more solid form you had originally envisaged.

Take the lid off the pan. It will be a solid block of fuck-I-can’t-throw-away-this-much-food. Add chicken broth. Make it a sauce for the rice — some of the lima beans are still visible in their whole form, and it is rife with flavor. Pretend you meant to do that and enjoy its deliciousness over rice. For it is delicious. Just unintentionally ugly.