Tag Archives: black pepper

Roasted Roots (ft. Cauliflower)

  • 1 small sweet potato
  • 3 medium red potatoes
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • onions
  • garlic
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 /2 tsp turmeric
  • 3/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/8 tsp asafoetida

It’s cold and I felt like neither going to a grocery store nor like overcomplicating the already brisk atmosphere. What was already in the kitchen that I could toss in the oven? This one’s almost in no need of directions — just cut everything up, toss it with olive oil then with the blend of above seasonings (adjust anything to taste, of course). Roast in a 350 oven° for 40m (or so). 4 spoons!

Advertisements

Daliciousness

In my pantry today:

  • 1.25 c moong dal
  • 3 medium-large red potatoes
  • 2 leaves of kale, minced
  • 1/2 large red onion
  • 1 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 14.5 oz cans vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp garlic paste
  • 1.5 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 2 tsp asafoetida

What’s a great animal-free meat substitute when there’s no tofu and no beans have been soaked? Dal! Moong dal can be cooked in 10m at a boil, so when the mood for a comfort-style meal hits too late to arrange a primary protein, these little orange beads can wink their collective eye. Or maybe not, because if they could wink then they would be coming from some kind of animal and I’m really trying here, guys.

Start the big deep-bottomed frying pan out on cold M with ghee, and when at full M (with the ghee having dissolved into tears at the hellfire below it) toss in the chunks of onion. Stir for just a moment, then add your thinly-sliced chunks of potato. Put in the garlic paste and stir until everything is coated. Add the almond milk, stir then sprinkle kale on top and cover. Let it come to a boil for about 5m, then return to add seasonings and grieve for that blisteringly gorgeous green on the kale that won’t last until chewing. Stir, then add the vegetable broth. Cover and let return to a boil on MH. Go take a load off.

It’s important to note that I cooked my moong dal beforehand, but they could probably be put in the big pan at this point. Oh well. I just added them after the potatoes were soft, and no flavor factors seemed tested. In fact, the ultimate judging of this dish was no test a-tall: 4 spoons.

Bacon Black Bean Blitzkrieg! (Now With Spoons!)

In my pantry today:

  • 1.5 c cooked black beans
  • 3 slices thick-cut bacon
  • 1/2 clove of garlic, skinned
  • 1/2 c water
  • 1 tbsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt (or more to taste)
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 c cooked Basmati rice

First thing’s first: Cut your three slices of bacon in half and start them off in a cold pan warming to MH. While that’s happening, crush your garlic cloves into chunks, and when the bacon is sizzling and ready for its first fork-flip add the garlic to the pan. I recommend, from learning the hard way, not to scatter it all around the pan. Keep the garlic isolated for easy removal in a few minutes when it becomes golden brown and crispy around the edges. Set aside for later garnishing.

Once the bacon begins to brown, cut it (either in the pan or taken out for a quick second) into inch long pieces and let finish browning until you are satisfied with the color (everyone’s got a different bacon barometer here). I let it cook until about 70% crispy. Drain out 1/4 c of the grease and reserve for future cookings. Add the black beans and pepper and gently toss until everything becomes one. Add water, salt and asafoetida then cover upon slow boil and reduce heat to ML. Let cook until more paste-like than water, then serve over rice with a fried garlic garnish.

With this recipe I am going to begin rating the success and deliciousness of each recipe I post from here on out using spoons. I give this eatsperiment 4 of 5 spoons. Spoons, you see, in an homage to Christine Miserandino’s Spoon Theory. It has become so much more widely known than it was when I discovered it a few years ago. I was desperate to find a way to explain my invisible limitations to others, and this story gave me, and countless others of all chronic illnesses, that ability. Imagine me now endcapping this article with a Braveheart-style spoon-thrust into the air.

 

And also because spoons, y’know, are in your kitchen ‘n junk.

Comfort Cabbage

In my pantry today:

  • 1 small head of red cabbage
  • 1/2 Hillshire Farms Hot Polska Kielbasa
  • 1 small yellow onion, coarsely diced
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 2 c water
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 2 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 c dry penne pasta
  • Parmasean cheese to taste

Start out, as usual, with that large stockpot. Thinly slice your kielbasa and put each slice face-down in the pot as it heats to M. Just let them slices be for about 10 minutes while you prep your other ingredients; coarsely dice your onion and put that tablespoon of salt in your water and set it aside. Once the sausage slices begin to brown, remove them from the pot. Replace with the onion and butter and let that cook for a few minutes while you dice (also coarsely) your head of cabbage. Mix it into the pot, coating all the purple with a sheen of black pepper and garlic. Pour in saltwater, cover and reduce heat to ML. Let the cabbage cook until it is of a reasonable wilt for your palette while in the meantime preparing your pasta. Drain at al dente and set aside with the sausage. Fifteen or so minutes before serving add sausage and al dente pasta. Stir and let heat together, serve with Parmasean cheese.

Hot Oinking Limas with Kale

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c soaked extra large lima beans
  • 2 c raw kale
  • 2 tbsp reserved sausage grease
  • 1 c dry basmati rice
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced clumsily
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1/2 tbsp mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 c water
  • 4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 2 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper

Rinse your overnight-soaked lima beans and start them to boiling. Start out on H and reduce heat, upon rolling boil, to M to let them simmer until done. Start your rice to soakin while you’re at it, then clumsily dice up an onion. In a large stockpot (I like using these whenever multiple ingredients are involved for I am irrepressibly graceless — please feel free to use a deep saucepan if you want to be, y’know, cheffy about it), get your sausage globs from the fridge melting. Add onion and mustard seeds, cook on M for a few minutes then reduce heat to L and add garlic and 2 tsp cayenne. Mix well then let mingle while you de-stem your kale.

Put oregano, turmeric, asafoetida, salt and 2 tsp cayenne in a measuring cup then fill with water to the 1/2 c line, stir and set aside.

Now it should be about time to cook the rice, so do that. When the lima beans aren’t shameful to your mouth, drain and set aside. Turn heat back up to MH on the stock pot. When it’s sizzlin real good, toss in the kale, sear it, then add the lima beans and toss. Pour in the 1/2 c seasoned water, then cover the pot and reduce to L. Let it all sit on L for at least 5m. Serve over Basmati rice.

Chappli Kale-bab

In my pantry today:

  • 1 bunch kale
  • 1 c soaked matpe beans
  • 1 package Shan® Spice Mix for Chappli Kabab
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 yellow onion
  • 1 medium slicing tomato
  • 5 slices of crystallized ginger
  • 2 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp Lemonaise®
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 c vegetable ghee
  • 1/2 c safflower oil

Boil your soaked beans for thirty to forty-five minutes. While that’s going on, chop onion into large chunks and throw into food processor; blend until paste-like. Then unload the dishwasher or something. Be patient, the beans will thank your digestive system later. Once soft enough to chew without making a face, drain the matpe and add it to the food processor.

Not burned, just made of black beans and shadows.

Add the spice mix, sesame oil and asafoetida and let it process itself for a minute or two. It should be a nice paste-like consistency. Put it in the fridge while you do this next here thing:

Wash your kale and begin stripping the veins. Tear or cut leaves into bite-size pieces and put in a large bowl. Mix Lemonaise™ with oil and vinegar then massage dressing into kale. Let sit for 15 minutes while you get back to this:

Take food processor bowl out of fridge and begin making nuggets. Your oil should be warming in a deep sauce pan on M-MH, for when it reaches sizzle-upon-tossed-droplet-of-water status, it is time to fry your balls. Flatten each ball slightly as you put it in the pan; after about 60 seconds, flip one to see its color. Once a satisfactory dark amber brown is reached on both sides, remove them from the pan onto a paper towel for a couple minutes of draining.

Arrange kale and sliced tomato on two plates, sprinkling each dish with 1/2 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp pepper. Top with your fried, protein-and-fiber-rich goodness. It will be spicy, and in fact was spicier than I anticipated. But in a good way. And I am proud that, egg notwithstanding for some, this is an entirely vegetarian meal. I am dutifully trying to add more kale into the culinary repertoire; right now I am trying to follow The Wahls Diet as closely as finances allow, and kale is an easy sell both for its price and nutritional value.

Now I am going to go collect that poster-child paycheck from the Kale Commission. ‘Night!

toFurst Time, Be Gentle

In my pantry today:

  • 1 package/block of extra firm tofu
  • 2/3 package whole wheat lasagna noodles
  • 2 half-jars of spaghetti sauce from the fridge
  • 1/4 yellow onion, finely diced
  • 1/2 c crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/2 c Parmasean cheese
  • 1/2 c mixed shredded cheese
  • 1 tsp jar pesto mix
  • 2 tsp garlic
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 2 tsp cayenne pepper

First, pray. You have never before cooked with tofu and things might get crazy.

Carefully extract your block o’fu and place between two clean/paper towels for squeezing out the extra water. My plan going into this whole shebang was to simply make fried tofu. That is what the internet primarily suggests for extra firm. Maybe this block didn’t read its own label. This alleged “Extra Firm” crumbled into little bits and I was so not in the mood to make a simple scramble. This was my first time and I wanted it to be special.

And what’s more special than an Italian girl making lasagna, too, for the first time? Yes, I am ashamed to admit that. It’s very “40 Year Old Virgin” of me to have never, not once in my life made lasagna. That’s bad and I should feel bad.

So crumble that tofu with a fork and reserve a cup (for recipe below) before seasoning. Take your two ass-jars of sauce from the fridge and combine them, adding cayenne and black pepper. Then go to town on your tofu: add in the rest of your seasonings and feta/Prmasean. Fork it all, gently, to hell. Pour a little sauce into the bottom of a 6×6″ pan. Put in a layer of uncooked noodles and top it with a hearty portion of your tofu mixture. Do another sauce/tofu/noodles series and top with more sauce, a few extra crumbles of tofu and some shredded cheese. Cover and put in a 375° oven for an hour. Let it sit for a few minutes upon taking it out, then take that first bite and have a moment to remember that will stay with you the rest of your life. Go ahead, you deserve it. In fact, if you could shake your own hand while still holding that fork, you would.

Also in my pantry:

  • 1 c crumbled extra firm tofu
  • 1 can sweetened condensed milk
  • 6 squares Ghirardelli 100% cacao baking chocolate
  • 1 c white chocolate chips

Put the tofu and sweetened condensed milk together in the food processor and allow them to make sweet, smooth love until silky. Pour into small pot, add broken chocolate pieces and stir over MH. When all is brown, pour into greased 1″ glass pan, sprinkle chips and press into the stuff then let set in fridge for a few hours. Then regret not putting it either into a pie shell or little serving cups as you take an otherwise-delightful spoon. This ended up tasting like dark-chocolate brownie batter and should have gotten put out to set in a proper pasture.

Ultimately, that lasagna was good enough to make it not goddamn matter about this dessert attempt anyway.

Color Theory Cooking

In my pantry today:

  • 1 head kale
  • 1 head red cabbage
  • 1 c dried moong dal
  • 1 small onion
  • 1/2 c water
  • 1 16oz can petite diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic-ginger paste
  • 2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp yellow curry
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 small dried red chili pepper

This will end up being a lot less visually attractive than when it starts, but isn’t that the case with much of life anyhow? At least, here, today, it will a visual let down apologized for by great taste and nutrient fever.*

Grab a stock pot and in it put your oil, onion and mustard seeds; let that cook on M for 10-15m. That’s plenty of time to chop up your head of cabbage and to de-vein your kale. When the onions begin to brown or mustard seeds begin popping (whichever comes first) add your cabbage. Stir to coat and let cook for 5m before adding in your kale. Stir, add water, cover, reduce heat to ML. Start your moong dal to boiling. Look through your cupboards for inspiration on what to do next. Pull out a can of tomatoes and all the aforementioned seasoning devices.

After the cabbakale is a little languid and more reasonable to open discussion, add the ginger-garlic paste and garlic powder. Stir thoroughly. Add tomatoes and remainder of your seasonings (except the dried red pepper) then stir and let sit until the dal is ready.
I didn’t need to drain the beans — they cooked in a small pot and absorbed all the water into a near-oatmealesque texture which worked well with the waterier texture of the stock pot contents. Combine dal and kalbbage, crush up dried pepper and sprinkle into the two as you merge them faithfully into one. Serve over that Basmati rice you had time to make yesterday.

 

 

*”Nutrient Fever” isn’t really a thing.

Sweet-N-Savory Soup

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c leftover cooked matpe beans
  • 1 c broccoli slaw
  • 1 leek
  • 1 c unsweetened flax milk
  • 1.5 c chicken broth
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1 vegetable bullion cube
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 2 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp black pepper

Slice your leek and saute it on M in 1tbsp olive oil. After a few minutes, decide you should add that second tbsp of oil. Mix it around and add the slaw mix. Add your garlic paste and vegetable bullion and mix it around some more (until the cube is decimated). Throw in your liquids and spices. Bring to a boil the reduce immediately to the lowest heat setting. Let it slow cook until the broccoli in the slaw is soft. Serve with some garlic naan and laugh at the cold rain what has been done forecast.

 

———-ADDENDUM———-

Instead of naan, we split an unopened small container of white rice from the Chinese takeout we got night before last. Between the two bowls, it was a perfect amount of rice added to a soup that looks and tastes better for it.

*ALSO — Don’t forget to add a dash of fart powder to this. If I don’t list asafoetida in an ingredient list that otherwise smacks of potential flatulence, please take it upon yourself to know how not to be a gassy windbag.