Tag Archives: chicken broth

Pan-a Stew-a: A Remedy for all Ills or Difficulties

In my pantry today:

  • 1 10 oz can chicken breast, drained
  • 1 14 oz can butter beans, drained
  • 1 L sweet potato, diced
  • 1 c kale, minced
  • 4-8 baby carrots, or whatever’s left in fridge
  • 1-2 c Basmati rice, cooked and cold
  • 1/2 L sweet yellow onion, sliced thin
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 14 oz cans chicken broth
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/3 tsp cumin
  • 1/3 tsp cayenne pepper
  • Parmesan cheese to top

panstewThis will be a cold February night’s remedy for all ills and difficulties; it will be, as well, a panacea of flavors. Get those large onion and small garlic minces into butter and olive oil heating to the M side of ML. After about ten toe-tapping minutes, add sweet potatoes, turmeric and 1 can of broth. Stir to coat. Another 5 minutes in, fond the last dregs of a still-viable bag of baby carrots and add them to the pan as well. Cover and boil over MH until potatoes begin to show signs of tenderness towards your fork. Add kale, chicken, rest of seasonings and rest of broth. continue cooking on L, covered until dinnertime. Five minutes before said time, increase the pan to M, add rice and slap the cover back on. As pan reaches the zenith of M turn it back off. Let sit for 2-5m then serve topped with Parmesan. 100 reasons for 5 spoons tonight!

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Hamming it Up in Hamtown, or “Who Needs an Entire BAG of Bones?”

In my pantry today:

  • 1 meaty hambone, ceremoniously frozen after its Christmas gifting from Mom and Dad
  • 1 28 oz can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 15 oz can “Italian” flavored diced tomatoes
  • 1 15 oz can green beans
  • 1 15 oz can corn
  • 1 15 oz can chicken broth
  • 2 c leftover cabbage
  • 2 tsp asafoetida
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 4 c water

Oh, the meaty hambone! It’s from one of them-there high-end holiday hams, so it’s definitely not got any such sort of canned or “poor” taste. As someone who falls under the poverty line I find this increases the flavor, and only serves to justify my “Mostly” form of vegetarianism.

Put everything in a big pot. Cook it for a day or more on L after bringing it to occasional slow boils. Make sure you also stir at intervals while inhaling deeply of its promising odor. This particular pot has been on the stove for two days and will be quite proud by that at dinner time.

5 spoons. One can nearly never best a good hambone.

Trial by Butcher Knife

In my pantry today:

  • 15 lbs exhaustion
  • 1 green apple, diced
  • 1 tbsp reserved bacon grease
  • 1 package Near East Whole Grain (Roasted Pecan and Garlic)
  • 1 16 oz can chicken broth
  • 2/3 c cooked white beans
  • 1/2 yellow onion, diced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, smashed ‘n diced
  • 1 tsp asafoetida

Oh man, I did not know where to start today.

Moderate MS fatigue still includes use of the limbs and does not mitigate the human need for food, so I opened the fridge and began dicing whatever might go bad earliest. I initiated a pan with onion and garlic in the bacon grease then began dicing the apple — and that’s where the exhaustion comes further into play, because this entire recipe got wildly better when I accidentally began bleeding all over the cutting board.  Losing use of one thumb to the butcher knife during the apple-dicing thereby rendered Napa cabbage prepping impossible (or at least wildly implausible). We had to go in another direction… one of little fine motor skills. Like a box of something.

Enter the broth and whole grain pilaf. Honestly, I hadn’t been certain what I’d do with the Near East product but it had sounded so delicious during a hungry-in-the-grocery-store moment. But pecans? Apples go with those! It was time to experiment.

I added a can of chicken broth to the pan and stirred in the beans (cooked for this recipe and living now in the Leftover Loft), then brought it to a boil and added the box-o-grains. It was at this point I just followed the box directions for the pilaf, as I was done trying original ideas. The gauze and scotch tape I found to cocoon my thumb may be soppin’ ass wet with chicken broth and blood but great measures my friends, great measures were taken to remove all the bloody apple chunks from the pan. There will be disappointment for any sanguinarians who show up on my doorstep tonight.

Even without the blood and with cognitive decline, this gets 3 solid spoons. 4 if you don’t normally hate green apples.

Three Animals and a Vegetarian Walk Into a Bar…

In my pantry today:

  • 1.5 c leftover cabbage
  • 1 can vegetable broth
  • 1 can chicken broth
  • 1 packet brown gravy mix
  • 1 tbsp. corn starch
  • 1 c. sliced raw spinach
  • 1 small carrot, poorly but thinly sliced
  • 2 c cooked Basmati rice

So there’s probably some cabbage leftover from last night’s jaunt down Stovetop Highway. Put it back on the stove, then pause and take a thoughtful moment for yourself. You deserve it.

While the pot is still cold (but warming to H) throw in your second six above ingredients. Stir until it is a murky brown mess, and bring it to a boil while not failing to stir regularly. Once the bubbles begin to appear, reduce heat to ML and let simmer until the carrots are at your preferred crunchsistency. Serve over rice while pondering how a pig, chicken and cow can get along so well with a can of vegetable broth. You might feel a twinge of animal gluttony shame, but this will taste enough like beef stew on a cold evening to negate any moral or ethical concerns.

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day, or “But her nuts!”

In my pantry today:

  • 2  c butternut squash in 1/4″ cubes
  • 2 tbsp unsweetened cashew butter
  • 1 16oz can chicken broth
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp+ cayenne pepper
  • 2 c cooked Basmati rice

Cook onion slivers in olive oil on M until they begin to become translucent; mix a tiny pinch of cayenne pepper in. Add squash and garlic. Cook pan contents for about a minute, then add 2 tbsp broth and cover the pan. In about another two minutes, remove pan contents from heat and set aside in a bowl. In hot-n-empty pan, begin sliding your hunk of cashew butter around. As it melts, slowly add broth and continue stirring patiently until there’s a rich gravy. Once the cashew butter is entirely dissolved into a delicious sauce, add back the butternut squash and rest of your cayenne pepper. Stir. Cover and let continue cooking on L until the squash is tooth-tender. Serve over rice and enjoy the hearty, spicy goodness while contemplating the beauty of that forecast thunderstorm.

Leftover Adverb Soup

In my pantry today:

  • 3ish c leftovers from yesterday
  • 49oz chicken broth
  • 10oz can coconut milk

Ta-da, soup! Now, to be fair I did end up adding the can of coconut milk before dinner last night. It was a whim that payed off well. Did I say “whim?” I could also have used the words “instinct” or “mystical predilection.” It was delicious either way, but the coconut milk ultimately served a more sinister purpose: dreams of leftover soup! And yes, all of my evil plans unfolded perfectly. Scrumptiously, even.

Thank You, Bacon Grease

In my pantry today:

  • 2 tbsp reserved bacon grease
  • 4c cooked, sliced/cubed sweet potato
  • 4c cooked lima beans
  • 1 leek
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • .5 tbsp salt
  • 1.5 c chicken broth
  • Basmati rice

Your dinner will owe its life to that reserved bacon grease.

So start out with a great idea. I imagined a delightful meal of various colors and textures; not another pot of mush, y’know? Start your sliced leek out in the bacon grease at M. Realize that not only are your sweet potatoes overcooked, but holy crapballs so are the shouldn’t-be-at-a-rolling-boil lima beans. This is why — one reason of I am certain many — not to self-engineer a double boiler while something is cooking under the melting chocolate. Sigh and mix the beans into the pan.

Carefully fold in the sweet potatoes. Add garlic and salt. Let it continue cooking on L for a solid 20m. In that time, embrace the mush as just as valid as the more solid form you had originally envisaged.

Take the lid off the pan. It will be a solid block of fuck-I-can’t-throw-away-this-much-food. Add chicken broth. Make it a sauce for the rice — some of the lima beans are still visible in their whole form, and it is rife with flavor. Pretend you meant to do that and enjoy its deliciousness over rice. For it is delicious. Just unintentionally ugly.

10 out of 10

In my pantry today:

  • 1 XL sweet potato
  • 2 tbsp cashew butter
  • 1.5 c chicken broth
  • 1 leek
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp cardamon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 box plain couscous

So like most people with families, I’ve been doing other, holiday-related business all damn day. When I walked blindly into the kitchen I automatically pulled something from that “we gonna go bad if’n you don’t cook us” list. Whenever sans plan, default to the produce drawer. Cupboard, in this case. I pulled out the highest ranking “bout to go” item and set about tinkering. Tinkering… for success.

Julienne your sweet potato while the finely-sliced leek is sizzling on M. Once the edges of your leeks brown, throw in the potato and seasonings; toss until everything is real friendly together then add the broth. Turn the pan up to MH and once it begins boiling, cover and reduce heat to ML. After leaving it the hell alone for twenty minutes, return to remove and reserve both the potato and broth. Put your cashew butter in the pan and slowly add the liquid back in, stirring consistently until you’ve got the consistency of that gravy people sometimes eat on their morning biscuits. Gently fold the sweet potato back in. Serve over plain couscous. I had no idea cashew gravy could be so meaty-delicious. I give this impromptu dinner experiment a 10 out of 10 (on that 1-10 scale I’ve never actually implemented in any real or consistent way).

Sweet-N-Savory Soup

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c leftover cooked matpe beans
  • 1 c broccoli slaw
  • 1 leek
  • 1 c unsweetened flax milk
  • 1.5 c chicken broth
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1 vegetable bullion cube
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 2 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp black pepper

Slice your leek and saute it on M in 1tbsp olive oil. After a few minutes, decide you should add that second tbsp of oil. Mix it around and add the slaw mix. Add your garlic paste and vegetable bullion and mix it around some more (until the cube is decimated). Throw in your liquids and spices. Bring to a boil the reduce immediately to the lowest heat setting. Let it slow cook until the broccoli in the slaw is soft. Serve with some garlic naan and laugh at the cold rain what has been done forecast.

 

———-ADDENDUM———-

Instead of naan, we split an unopened small container of white rice from the Chinese takeout we got night before last. Between the two bowls, it was a perfect amount of rice added to a soup that looks and tastes better for it.

*ALSO — Don’t forget to add a dash of fart powder to this. If I don’t list asafoetida in an ingredient list that otherwise smacks of potential flatulence, please take it upon yourself to know how not to be a gassy windbag.

Drrrty Rice

In my pantry today:

  • 2 Hot Italian Sausages
  • Can-o-beans (red)
  • Yellow onion
  • Clove of garlic
  • Vegetable ghee
  • Basmati Rice
  • 1tbsp chicken broth
  • Cayenne pepper

So. Dice half a large yellow onion and 2/3 clove of garlic up real fine and let them simmer in 1tsp of ghee on medium for about ten minutes. During this lost time between you and the stove-top, go ahead and get your rice soaking, rinse your can-o-beans and remove the skin from your two uncooked sausages. Then smoosh the contents into the pan. Cook for what seems like forever until the sausages are well cooked-n-crumbled. Add the beans and stir until coated, at which point you wanna toss in that tbsp of broth and cover. Turn the heat off and let it sit until your rice is ready (you did remember to actually cook that, right?). Once the rice has cooked and cooled a moment in the uncovered air, fluff it gently and stir in your delicious frying pan contents. Mix it up, study your cajun accent (or just go ahead and be an offensive stereotype about it. In fact, just go whole hog and marry Italian and Cajun dialects on this one.) and enjoy!