Tag Archives: cinnamon

Cooking for Dogs

In my pantry today:

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 c eggshells
  • 1/4 c buckwheat, uncooked
  • 1 c barley, uncooked
  • 4 c rice, cooked
  • 1/3 c ground flax
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste (optional)

Dog food is expensive, and lordy knows the canned stuff dogs love is filled with loads of unhealthy nonsense. That little voice in my inner ears (it lives beside the tinnitus) can’t let me keep stuffing them full of it. We’re not ready to make the “kids” go cold turkey on all store-bought food, so the dry food will stay (I use quotation marks because there is a succinct difference between animals and human children — in case you were unclear or suspected that I might be). In place of the wet food (I also hate opening cans because it is difficult), we did a little preliminary research and married what of it we could with our pantry. We had to buy the ground meat, but everything else was right here.

Combine dry buckwheat and barley — cook together in 2c water with turmeric, cinnamon and garlic paste. Completely cook ground turkey, and add egg shells when it’s browned. Mix. Add rice and pot of seasoned barley/buckwheat to large pot where your meat lives. Stir together and refrigerate contents for the upcoming week. We’ve got two dogs at 25/80lbs, respectively… the goal is to make enough food that weekly wet food costs will negate themselves. Until and beyond then, however, dog food will not get a spoon rating (sorry, Emeril!).

Cowboy is a boy. And a French Maid.

This recipe will yield about 10c of dog nom… now we just need to pray that they’ll eat it. This shouldn’t be a terribly risky proposition, but my pretty, pretty princess decided suddenly to hate eggs when we began hard boiling those instead of opening cans… he has eaten with no problem all of (but not limited to) these things:

  • cat poop
  • an entire bag of Ghirardelli dark chocolate squares
  • watermelon
  • carrots
  • an entire jar of Vaseline

Nobody would’ve considered Cowboy the alpha of the house but Sadie followed suit within a day, urging us (upon seeing the what a soft boiled egg turns into the next morning when allowed to fester overnight) to make the necessary changes for both their palette and our pantry. Fingers’ crossed for tonight’s meal.

—–UPDATE—————————

Yeah, they both loved it like a fat kid loves cake.

 

Chicken and Buckwheat and Salad, Oh My!

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c Colonel Cat’s Crock Pot Chicken* pulled meat
  • 2 c Colonel Cat’s Crock Pot Chicken* stock
  • 1 c buckwheat Kasha
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 3 c leftover salad mix
  • 1 shaved carrot
  • 2 tbsp fresh blueberries
  • 1 tbsp golden raisins
  • 2 tbsp feta cheese
  • 4 tsp olive oil
  • 4 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp balsamic vinegar

Because I am a little overwhelmed with fatigue right now, yesterday my better half set the thawed whole fryer from the fridge to be ready for me to contend with on a level today which far surpasses that of general convenience foods. I separated the broth from the carcass and the meat from the bones. Then I fed the dogs a little of the super soggy crock pot chicken skin before tossing the bones. The chicken came out so tender and fragrant; it was a natural complement to whatever approached to shake its hands.

*Colonel Cat’s Crock Pot Chicken:

  • 1 2lb whole naked fryer
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2. tsp salt
  • 6 c water

Did someone call the colonel?

I picked up a box of Kasha at the store yesterday — I admit to never having heard of it before, though it appeared to be an answer to my consistent “make sure there’s protein without meat” dilemma. I took a chance and was rewarded handsomely. It cooks up like a cross between pearl couscous and steel cut oats, and because I substituted stock for water it came out with a fragrance and flavor that crooked a finger for the chicken to come hither. Toss the pulled meat, 1/2 tsp salt and 1 tsp red hot chili powder with the Kasha. Set aside.

Ring the inside of a large bowl with salad greens and top with raisins, blueberries and carrots. Scoop a dollop of the chicken and Kasha combo into the middle then top the bowl with feta cheese. Seal the deal with a little olive oil, lemon juice and balsamic vinegar. This was a surprisingly wonderful combination — I did not expect to like buckwheat at all, but that may have been largely due to the fact that I assumed Eddie Murphy would not be as delicious as he may have once been. Now, I know the true face of buckwheat. 5 stars!

Power to Ya Health Breakfast!

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c cooked steel-cut oats
  • 1 tbsp ground golden flax seeds
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • 1/8 tsp asafoetida
  • 1 tbsp walnuts

So this one’s real easy once you’ve made a batch of the steel-cut oatmeal and stocked it in the fridge (or if you’ve just finished making said batch). Stir all that junk up there, ‘cept the nuts, into your oatmeal. Once hot, put it in a bowl (if’n you’re feeling hifallutin) and top with a few walnuts. It’s a delicious experience — I will never again eat instant oatmeal because I did not know how delicious the true face of oatmeal was. The consistency is amazing — silky without being slimy, then a chewable texture that the instant stuff doesn’t provide. It’s almost more pudding-like than any oatmeal I’ve before experienced. 5 damn spoons, yo.

 

Middle Easternish White Beans and SCIENCE!

In my pantry today:

  • About 2c. soaked-n-cooked white beans
  • 1 medium-large-ish yellow onion, finely diced
  • 1 tsp ghee
  • 1/2 tsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp garlic-ginger paste
  • Jar of roasted red peppers
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper

So I did a little kitchen reconnaissance on Google concerning What The Hell To Do With White Beans. This recipe sounded good, and I figured I could whip something akin to it up. Because plain baked beans are boring. And too sweet. And I don’t have bacon or brown sugar in the pantry. But I have a lot of beans and a lot of rice. Nothing is impossible, and whereas I don’t care for the flavor journey of traditional baked beans I do still firmly believe that beans and rice don’t have to be boring.

Cook the onion in the ghee on M for about 10m. Add diced red peppers (to taste/I used a generous 1/4 c) and ginger-garlic paste. Transfer the whole mess to your food processor and make it a delicately chunky puree. Put tomato paste in the hot pot (turn heat down a little during this) to let it melt, then add the puree back. Mix it well and bring it back to a low boil. While it’s spit-bubbling, add the remainder of the spices and mix for a minute or so while low-boiling. Add your beans. Bring back to a low boil and turn off the pot. I am serving this tonight over, of course, Basmati rice.

Do you have a chronic illness? I watched this video last night and imagine hope the recipes on this blog get to adjust to a diet just like the one described therein. I took notes, people. Right now I am four months into a SNAP card not-really-a-battle-because-it’s-DSS-and-they-can’t-help-the-confusion; once I receive the ability to cook with a little extra help (that also validates my poverty!) I hope to switch more completely to a “Hunter-Gatherer” style diet. I once loved to cook because I loved to eat (and I’m Italian!). I want to cook now for my body. I have a friend with MS who is following a Paleo diet and seeing the positive results; when I watched the above-linked video I cried quietly while furiously scribbling words like “polyphenols.” I’ve recently learned how important what you put in your body can be (16lbs to go before I’ve lost 100!) and the clinical affirmation you’ll see therein is enough to stand me up like a soldier. I want to make myself better. I want to be able to sit in repose like everyone else. I want to make my “eyeball seizures” stop. I want my memory back. I want to be able to intelligently communicate with other people face-to-face again. My lucidity remains between my brain and fingertips, but it seems to wander off during real-time interactions. As per this video, the human brain literally shrinks in conditions like mine. I am not surprised; in fact, I am grateful for the explanation. Not knowing is worse, always. Be good to yourselves.