Tag Archives: flax

Orange-Banana Bread with Dark Chocolate and a Pecan Crust

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c whole wheat flour
  • 1 c Bob’s Red Mill 5 grain rolled hot cereal
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2.25 cups mashed overripe bananas
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 3 tbsp ground flax
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 c crushed pecan halves
  • 1/2-2/3 c dark chocolate chips
  • 5 drops doTerra® wild orange essential oil

chocolate_orangeYou know those chocolate oranges you find all over the place during the holidays — the ones that give you a delicious reason during times of culturally heightened stresses to hit something other than a coworker/friend/uncle/stranger/wall? That kind of holiday spirit is the inspiration, without the insinuation of violence, for these little loaves.

To make the batter, start out by putting all of your dry ingredients in a bowlobbread
together and putting in another bowl the butter and brown sugar. Cream those latter two, then add the mashed bananas; mix. Add the beaten egg; mix. Fold in the dry ingredients and chocolate chips. For a final touch, carefully drop wild orange oil in carefully, tasting after each until your orangey desires are met. Pour into whatever size loaf pans you’d like and crunch pecan halves over the top, pressing pecans gently into the wet mix. Bake at 350° for an hour, or until an inserted butter knife comes out clean. I combat the guilt of a stick of butter with the knowledge that I’m also feeding people I love whole wheat flour, whole grain oats, barley, rye, double flax and triticale (absolutely none of which you can taste over the banana, orange, chocolate and pecans). 5 spoons!

 

Healthy(ish) Banana Bread and Subsequent Muffin Attempting

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c whole wheat flour
  • 1 c Bob’s Red Mill 5 grain rolled hot cereal
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2.5 cups mashed overripe bananas
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 tbsp ground flax
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 c crushed pecan halves
  • 1 tbsp cacao powder

nanabread2As in most baking recipes, combine all the dry stuff in one bowl and mix the wet stuff in another after creaming butter and sugar. Add mashed up bananas to the wet stuff, then mix it all together. Well, do this with everything but the cacao powder. That’ll be for the mini-muffins you’ll make with the overbatter.  Bake in a 350° oven for 45-60m (until a butter knife comes out of the middle clean).  The whole grain cereal you’re using includes whole grain red wheat, rye, barley, oats and flaxseed (if you’d read the bag more thoroughly before baking you might not have added that extra flax, but oh(mega) well), and using whole wheat flour instead of all-purpose makes this banana bread feel more like breakfast without dampening the flavor (thank you, butter and sugar!). This bread came out more moist than many loaves I have before tasted, and earns 4 spoons for its combination of nutrients and flavor. What batter didn’t fit in my 7.5×3 loaf pan got mixed with some cacao powder and glopped into a mini-muffin pan. This needed to bake just as long as the loaf, but aren’t nearly as moist — just chewy. They only get 2 spoons, boo!

Cooking for Dogs

In my pantry today:

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 c eggshells
  • 1/4 c buckwheat, uncooked
  • 1 c barley, uncooked
  • 4 c rice, cooked
  • 1/3 c ground flax
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste (optional)

Dog food is expensive, and lordy knows the canned stuff dogs love is filled with loads of unhealthy nonsense. That little voice in my inner ears (it lives beside the tinnitus) can’t let me keep stuffing them full of it. We’re not ready to make the “kids” go cold turkey on all store-bought food, so the dry food will stay (I use quotation marks because there is a succinct difference between animals and human children — in case you were unclear or suspected that I might be). In place of the wet food (I also hate opening cans because it is difficult), we did a little preliminary research and married what of it we could with our pantry. We had to buy the ground meat, but everything else was right here.

Combine dry buckwheat and barley — cook together in 2c water with turmeric, cinnamon and garlic paste. Completely cook ground turkey, and add egg shells when it’s browned. Mix. Add rice and pot of seasoned barley/buckwheat to large pot where your meat lives. Stir together and refrigerate contents for the upcoming week. We’ve got two dogs at 25/80lbs, respectively… the goal is to make enough food that weekly wet food costs will negate themselves. Until and beyond then, however, dog food will not get a spoon rating (sorry, Emeril!).

Cowboy is a boy. And a French Maid.

This recipe will yield about 10c of dog nom… now we just need to pray that they’ll eat it. This shouldn’t be a terribly risky proposition, but my pretty, pretty princess decided suddenly to hate eggs when we began hard boiling those instead of opening cans… he has eaten with no problem all of (but not limited to) these things:

  • cat poop
  • an entire bag of Ghirardelli dark chocolate squares
  • watermelon
  • carrots
  • an entire jar of Vaseline

Nobody would’ve considered Cowboy the alpha of the house but Sadie followed suit within a day, urging us (upon seeing the what a soft boiled egg turns into the next morning when allowed to fester overnight) to make the necessary changes for both their palette and our pantry. Fingers’ crossed for tonight’s meal.

—–UPDATE—————————

Yeah, they both loved it like a fat kid loves cake.

 

“Best So Far” Pops

In my pantry today:

  • 1 banana
  • 2 c strawberries
  • 1/2 c blueberries
  • 1/2 c sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 1/4 c ground flax
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp  cinnamon

As has been previously discussed, my regard for fruit is mostly a resigned complacency toward the importance of nutrition. Getting all my “colors” in a daily diet is difficult (as is unanticipated alliteration), and making popsicles has put a new spin (food processor shout out!) on the issue. Throw all of the above into a food processor/blender and chew your nails while they freeze, for indeed they will bring a mighty wind of happy flavor. 5 spoons!

Blueberry and Mango C’s-cake Popsicles

In my pantry:

  • 1 mango
  • 1 lg carrot
  • 2 c blueberries
  • 6 oz sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 c ground flax
  • 1/4 c unsweetened almond milk

Healthy! Well with the exception of the sweetened condensed milk, of course… but even still I’m banking on the vitamin content to nullify any sugar/dairy-related missteps. This pop-cipe tries to cover the vitamin A B C’s as well as omega-3s, and fiber ‘n junk. This will be an excellent daytime snack — between the heat and the phytonutrient content, I nearly expect to start sprouting oranges outta my armpits! 5 spoons!

 

Carrorarine Pops!

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c kale
  • 2 nectarines
  • 1 navel orange (seeds removed)
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 1/2 c plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp ground flax

Chop kale, remove stems and blanch for 10 seconds; drain. In the food processor, put all ingredients and blend until at your preferred consistency. Fill popsicle molds with the delicious nutrition and freeze ’til NOM. 4 spoons!

Phytopop Friday! (or, “Afternoon Delight”)

In my pantry today:

  • 3 leaves kale
  • 1 small red apple
  • 5 strawberries
  • 1/4 c plain Greek yogurt
  • 1-2 c unsweeteend almond milk
  • 1/4 c ground flax
  • 1 tbsp honey

This one’s easy. Put everything in the food processor, add almond milk to your consistency’s desire, then pour into popsicle molds; freeze. I’m not saying that this is the zenith of potential nutrients in one frozen treat, but it kinda looks like that’s what I’m aiming for — these guys visually appealing while being chock full of phytonutrients! 5 spoons!

 

Power to Ya Health Breakfast!

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c cooked steel-cut oats
  • 1 tbsp ground golden flax seeds
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • 1/8 tsp asafoetida
  • 1 tbsp walnuts

So this one’s real easy once you’ve made a batch of the steel-cut oatmeal and stocked it in the fridge (or if you’ve just finished making said batch). Stir all that junk up there, ‘cept the nuts, into your oatmeal. Once hot, put it in a bowl (if’n you’re feeling hifallutin) and top with a few walnuts. It’s a delicious experience — I will never again eat instant oatmeal because I did not know how delicious the true face of oatmeal was. The consistency is amazing — silky without being slimy, then a chewable texture that the instant stuff doesn’t provide. It’s almost more pudding-like than any oatmeal I’ve before experienced. 5 damn spoons, yo.

 

Spicy Crockpot Chicken with Parsely-Walnut Pesto (or, “The Corned Beef is All Yours Today”)

In my pantry today:

  • 1.5 c chicken tenders
  • Ancient Harvest® garden pagodas
  • 1 c parsley sprigs (stems removed)
  • 1/2 c walnuts
  • 1/2 c olive oil
  • 3 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tbsp ground flax seeds
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 1.5 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

Start your chicken out on the train to Easytown — plop it in the slow cooker with 2 tbsp garlic paste, cayenne and black pepper and cover with water. Set the cooker on L and walk away for a few hours. It’s a great set up, actually, because your pesto will only taste better after it’s sat a minute:

Put parsley, walnuts, Parmesan, salt, flax, 1/2 tsp black pepper, 1 tbsp garlic paste into the food processor and puree the heck out of it. When it’s good and chunk-free (even the little chunks! be vigilant!), move it to an airtight container in the fridge and pray your patience will bring a huge, delicious payoff.

At dinnertime, boil water and cook your gluten-free pasta; drain. While it’s still hot mix in all but 1tbsp of the pesto, making sure to get a little all up in the crooks and spirals of your self-proclaimed “pagodas” — really, they taste nothing like a Buddhist or Taoist temple of worship, but the flavor of your earlier endeavor should eclipse this misnomer. Strain your chicken and mix it up with the remaining tbsp of pesto, then marry the pasta and the meat. Mazel tov, 4 spoons!

And because it is St. Patrick’s Day, Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Please note that, despite often having my Irish red hair belie my Italian heart (and that birthmark on my head that grows black hair), I did not make corned beef today. Did I just forget? Not have it in the pantry and have no vehicle with which to go procure some from a grocer? No and yes. I have never liked it, and even if I wasn’t dead-set (so to speak) on getting to an animal-free diet you would never catch it on any plate of mine. And a day that forces it down your throat (along with copious amounts of alcohol)? I am no fan. Despite the red damn hair. Here, let me have another disenfranchised genetic Irish speak:

“I have never been greatly tied emotionally or sentimentally to my own Irish background. The Irish in America are sometimes more Irish than the Irish and I suppose some of my indifference is a reaction against that.” – Flannery O’Connor Letter, 7/25/63

To summarize: I have red hair and a genetic heritage linked in part to the Irish culture but will consume neither corned beef nor copious amounts of alcohol. Happy St. Patty’s!