Tag Archives: ginger

The First 5+

In my pantry today:

  • 1.25 c frozen spinach
  • 1.25c blanched, chopped kale
  • 12 0z canned tomato sauce (plain)
  • 1 L yellow onion
  • 1/4 c olive oil
  • 1 tbsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 tsp garlic paste
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp fenugreek
  • 1 tsp fennel
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp chile de arbol powder
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • dash asafoetia

P1100258I had some major cupboard rearranging to do so I started the onions in oil with mustard seeds on ML and let them rest largely unattended for about 30m. Sprinkle on turmeric a few minutes in, mix. Turn stove to M an mix in pastes and other spices until a gummy mound forms; dispatch the mound with your spatula and a small dollop of tomato sauce. Add greens and let the food processor run for a couple of minutes; spoon it back into the pan and stir in the remainder of your tomato sauce. Heat and eat, or add paneer, meat or a meat substitute — I threw in some cooked chana dal (split chickpeas) and served it over Basmati rice. I ate this for lunch and again for dinner… and maybe I heated my dinner in a small Ikea skillet then ate it then licked the skillet. Don’t you judge me.

kaleI know that eating foods of color is the way to go, so I feel really good about not only the outstanding 5+ spoons of taste this delivers but also because the recipe is full of enough greens for me to want to add a +. Following the Wahls Diet is my goal, but still isn’t entirely possible — both financially (SNAP only delivers so much) and… because I am still a product of my fatty culture and will submit to its baser dietary desires.*

 

 

* Don’t you judge me.

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WaaahTons (or, “When in Doubt, Fry it”)

In my pantry today:

  • 20ish wonton wrappers
  • 1 c ground turkey
  • 1 c leftover asian slaw that never got written about
  • 1/2 c shredded jack/cheddar mix
  • 1 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp minced red onion
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric

Because my partner works odd hours, timing a meal can prove difficult. Wontons do not tolerate this — or at least I have not found the magical process. Today will only be my third time trying, and this time I have vowed to make good on transparency. I have some minor motor skill problems, so delicate tasks like “removing individual wrapper from stack of wrappers” and “folding wrapper properly around filling” generally annoy the balls outta me because I do them poorly. But wontons are a thing now, and I must conquer their tiny bodies
with impunity.

Ok, so she’ll be home from work for the day around 3. The filling is made and chilling in a bowl. Lo, these wontons will also need a dipping sauce!
  • 1/2 c Grandma’s fig jam
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp garlic ginger paste
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp hot red chili powder

The second wonton attempt ended in soggy despair, but the slaw was pretty tasty. It was saved in the fridge, hopefully, for this day.

And, hell, I’d written up the slaw-gredients days ago:

  • 2/3 head red cabbage, diced
  • 2 c kale, diced and marinated in sesame oil
  • 1/2 c edamame, shelled
  • 1/2 c sliced leek greens
  • 1/2 c crumbled ramen noodles
  • 1/3 c cashew pieces
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce

That was a labor of delicious love to which I should’ve here previously copped. The slaw would’ve gotten 4 spoons and these wontons… these wontons right here? And their sauce? 5 spoons and proud of it!

Let’s Rice and Roll!

In my pantry today:

  • 6-8 leaves kale
  • 3/4 c cooked black matpe beans
  • 1/4 c cooked basmati rice
  • 1/2 c ricotta cheese
  • 1/4 c ground golden flax
  • 1/2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh basil
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Before v. After Blanching

Ok, this part is actually way more simple than the ingredient list might suggest. Just cream all of it together then set aside while water begins boiling. When the water boils, dip each leaf of kale by the tip of ts stem for a count of ten then transfer to paper towel. Dump the water out of the pot and start your sauce in it:

  • 1/2 medium Vidalia onion
  • 2 medium salt-roasted beets
  • 2 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 8 oz can plain tomato sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 1 tbsp black mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp kala jeera
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp hot curry powder
  • 2 tsp madras curry powder

In the pot, burner reduced to ML, insert your ghee and oil and top with mustard seeds, kala jeera, onions and garlic. Stir and let sit on the burner as the temperature drops. This would be a good time to carefully slice the stems out of your kale. Do that then come back, add diced beet and turn the heat back up to M; stir and let cook for about 5 minutes (or until the edges of your garlic slices begin to brown). Mix in a shot of vinegar and reduce heat to ML for another 10-15m.

That presents an excellent opportunity to begin constructing the actual rolls: put a teaspoon full near the base of a leaf, then roll up as tightly as possible without smooshing out the ends like a melty ice cream sandwich. Set each roll, seam side down, aside. Get back to that sauce.

Transfer pot contents to the food processor and puree. Scrape sides and add in almond milk and the remainder of seasonings. When at as fine a consistency as your palette desires, transfer back to the stove and add in tomato sauce. Bring to an easy boil on M then immediately reduce temperature to L. Put a spoonful of sauce in the bottom of a small glass baking dish then put your kale rolls in. Cover and bake at 350° for 20m. Serve, bottom-up from the plate: rice, sauce, rolls, maybe a little more sauce. 5 spoons for the rolls! They retained their crunch even after the oven. The sauce will get 4 spoons, if only because I still have unresolved bigotry issues towards beets.