Tag Archives: slaw

Black Beans ‘n Slaw

  • 1 12 oz can black beans
  • 2 c red cabbage
  • 3/4 c asparagus, minced
  • 1/8 c minced red onion
  • 4 baby carrots, shredded
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 1/4 c red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp garlic paste
  • 3 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 2 dash asafoetida
  • feta cheese to taste (omit for vegan status)

P1100429This is easier than the ingredient list suggests: start by emptying a can of black beans into a small pot. Add 1 tsp garlic paste, 2 tsp chili powder, 1 tsp turmeric and a dash asafoetida; bring to a low boil on MH and reduce to ML once said boil is reached. Cover, let cook for as long as it’s got liquid.

I did use the food processor for a quick few pulses on the cabbage for a closer-to-slaw-without-being-too-tiny-to-care-it’s-cabbage size, and I used a cheese grater on the carrots. Come to think of it, the cheese grater might’ve been a good idea for the onion too, but today a knife did the trick. I dealt with frozen whole asparagus stems, and carefully excised 1/8-1/4″ chips from the top half of the stems. So mix all of that together.

In a small sauce pan, heat oil on ML and add garlic paste. Stir until paste is one with the oil. Mix vinegar with the rest of the seasonings; once pan is hot and paste dispersed stir in vinegar mix. Pour over all the stuff you mixed together from the above paragraph and let sit at room temperature for an hour. Top with your preferred quantity of feta cheese (about 1/3 c here) and serve alongside black beans over rice. These two dishes are surprisingly good together; I ended up mixing everything together and it tasted like the burrito filling you’d get at a fancy, um, burrito filling place… except with no sour cream and little cheese it was a touch less terrible for your health. 4 spoons!

The Dinner Slawlad

In my pantry today:

  • 3 c red cabbage, shredded
  • 1/3 c walnut halves/pieces
  • 1/2 mozarella ball, in tiny cubes
  • 1 S carrot, shredded
  • 1/4 c baby corn kernels
  • 1 tbsp celery, minced
  • 1 green onion, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced thin
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/3 c red wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinager
  • 2 tsp white sugar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 3 dashes black pepper

slawlad

I spent a lifetime not liking cole slaw, but I had never had anything but mayonnaise-based cole slaws and thus considered no other slaws of which to speak. About two years ago a little place called Farm Boy’s in Chapin, SC would become the new slaw-spiration in my vastly expanding relationship with cabbage. It was easy to accept with joy the health benefits of cruciferous vegetables, and the general price of a head of cabbage means there’s almost always one in the fridge. This cost:benefit ratio makes it an exciting endeavor to make an entree out of cabbage. Don’t you scoff.

Start your thinly sliced garlic simmering on the L side of ML. Let it infuse while you prep other ingredients. Whisk together sugar and vinegar; set aside. When you’ve got mixed in all the solids but cheese and walnuts, increase the oil to the high end of ML. Toast walnuts with garlic for a minute or two, stirring frequently, then mix in vinegar/sugar mixture. Pour warm dressing and walnuts over and into the bowl of cabbage. You can mix in the cheese now, or wait until serving time — if it sits in the vinegar it will emerge with almost a paneer-like texture. This is not necessarily a bad thing; plus it turns pink.

Let the entire cabbage conundrum  sit at room temperature for at least an hour before serving or chilling. I let it sit at room temperature for a couple hours before serving, then I waited a day of refrigeration before serving the rest — both ways work fine. This is going to become a meal staple as the weather begins to warm into its boil: prepare yourselves for more summer slawlads at 5 spoons!

 

WaaahTons (or, “When in Doubt, Fry it”)

In my pantry today:

  • 20ish wonton wrappers
  • 1 c ground turkey
  • 1 c leftover asian slaw that never got written about
  • 1/2 c shredded jack/cheddar mix
  • 1 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp minced red onion
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric

Because my partner works odd hours, timing a meal can prove difficult. Wontons do not tolerate this — or at least I have not found the magical process. Today will only be my third time trying, and this time I have vowed to make good on transparency. I have some minor motor skill problems, so delicate tasks like “removing individual wrapper from stack of wrappers” and “folding wrapper properly around filling” generally annoy the balls outta me because I do them poorly. But wontons are a thing now, and I must conquer their tiny bodies
with impunity.

Ok, so she’ll be home from work for the day around 3. The filling is made and chilling in a bowl. Lo, these wontons will also need a dipping sauce!
  • 1/2 c Grandma’s fig jam
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp garlic ginger paste
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp hot red chili powder

The second wonton attempt ended in soggy despair, but the slaw was pretty tasty. It was saved in the fridge, hopefully, for this day.

And, hell, I’d written up the slaw-gredients days ago:

  • 2/3 head red cabbage, diced
  • 2 c kale, diced and marinated in sesame oil
  • 1/2 c edamame, shelled
  • 1/2 c sliced leek greens
  • 1/2 c crumbled ramen noodles
  • 1/3 c cashew pieces
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce

That was a labor of delicious love to which I should’ve here previously copped. The slaw would’ve gotten 4 spoons and these wontons… these wontons right here? And their sauce? 5 spoons and proud of it!

Bacon Soft Tacos with Mandarin-Cilantro Kaleslaw

In my pantry today:

  • 1 lb thick-cut bacon
  • 1/4 c fresh cilantro, minced
  • 1 c shredded kale
  • 1/2 c shredded cheese (I’m using something called “Fiesta Blend”)
  • 6 or so flour tortillas
  • 1/4 c mandarin vinaigrette
  • 1/4 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1 tsp Fiesta chili powder
  • 2 tbsp onions, minced
  • 2 diced roma tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp sour cream

I’m having a tough day (y’know, the stupid disease) so we’re gonna try to keep this quick. Please tell me you already know how to cook bacon and dice things up (I’m betting you do). This is mostly going to be a post about the “kaleslaw,” for, lo, it was good:

Mince Kale along a parallel, then perpendiculize its ass a time or two. I sliced about 1/2 cm along a parallel to shred, then I gave a couple minces across the grid in my mind (so as to, as they say, “perpendiculize”). Immediately massage the vinaigrette into the lil lengths, then set aside. Mince your cilantro and toss it in with the seasonings listed above then let the whole mess marinate for a few hours. Upon the dining hour, layer bacon with cheese, onions, and tomato then top with kaleslaw to taste. Oh, and sour cream to taste.

This recipe allows for a great deal of bacon grease to reserve; as close to animal-free as my diet wants to become (and the more I cannot abide the thought of eating large slabs of flesh), it can’t argue with fat (in small amounts) being flavor. And did you know, sweet readers, that bacon could ever be made more delicious? It apparently is so: the sweetness and spice of the slaw went in tandem with bacon’s sweet serenade. I will make this slaw, or more likely just a slaw like it, again. 5 spoons!

 

Sweet-N-Savory Soup

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c leftover cooked matpe beans
  • 1 c broccoli slaw
  • 1 leek
  • 1 c unsweetened flax milk
  • 1.5 c chicken broth
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1 vegetable bullion cube
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 2 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp black pepper

Slice your leek and saute it on M in 1tbsp olive oil. After a few minutes, decide you should add that second tbsp of oil. Mix it around and add the slaw mix. Add your garlic paste and vegetable bullion and mix it around some more (until the cube is decimated). Throw in your liquids and spices. Bring to a boil the reduce immediately to the lowest heat setting. Let it slow cook until the broccoli in the slaw is soft. Serve with some garlic naan and laugh at the cold rain what has been done forecast.

 

———-ADDENDUM———-

Instead of naan, we split an unopened small container of white rice from the Chinese takeout we got night before last. Between the two bowls, it was a perfect amount of rice added to a soup that looks and tastes better for it.

*ALSO — Don’t forget to add a dash of fart powder to this. If I don’t list asafoetida in an ingredient list that otherwise smacks of potential flatulence, please take it upon yourself to know how not to be a gassy windbag.