Tag Archives: soup

TNP, vol. III – Chicken-Coconut Soup w/ Pumpkin & Penne

In my pantry today:

  • 1 12oz can coconut milk
  • 3 c broth of roasted chicken carcass
  • 2 c meat of aforementioned carcass
  • 3 c pumpkin in 2″ cubes
  • 1 c penne pasta, cooked to al dente
  • 1/4 c cilantro, chopped
  • 1/4 c roasted pumpkin seeds

coconutchickensoupThe wonderful thing about having a whole, roasted animal in the house is that the meal-yield (say that five times fast) is better than above board. With all of the seasonings had by our bird, adding anything more would have been an irrelevant waste of good spices.

Combine broth and coconut milk, and bring to a near-rolling boil. Add pumpkin and reduce heat to L until fork-tender. Add penne and chicken in; stir until warm. Serve garnished with cilantro and seeds. Then eat the seeds first, because they ended up being pretty for presentation but quickly became unhappily chewy. Other than that learning experience, this gets 5 spoons!

TNP, vol. II – Loaded Baked Punk-tato Soup

In my pantry today:

  • 2-3 c 2″ pumpkin cubes
  • 4 medium Russet potatoes
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tbsp minced onion
  • 1 tbsp bacon grease
  • 3 slices thick-cut bacon
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1-3 c chicken broth (depending on how “soupy” you want it)
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • dash asafoetida
  • 1/4 c shredded muenster cheese
pumptatoandbaconsoup

Is it cold where you live, and do you care about bacon?

Boil all of your pumpkin and potato (I leave potato skins on since there’s more nutrients in the skin than there is in the rest of the tater) in as much tandem as possible with cooking your bacon. When your bacon comes out of the oven, set the strips aside to cool on a paper towel and immediately spoon a tbsp of the pan drippings into the pot which where our finished product will ultimately live. In fact, the garlic and onions are already at the place!

Start with ML for 5m, then reduce to L after a minute or two. Stir in turmeric, pepper, salt and asafoetida Let it simmer another minute or five while you ready your handy food processor. The potatoes/pumpkin should both be from fork- to falling-apart tender, and should turn easily into a uniform mash; transfer from food processor to soup pot. Mix in nutritional yeast. Stir in broth until the soup is the consistency you like.

For serving: Crumble bacon on top of dish and sprinkle with muenster cheese. 5 spoons and a big thank you to pumpkins everywhere!

Processing Leftovers

In my pantry:

cauliflowerleftoversoupEasier than easy! Ask the food processor to deal with yesterday’s leftovers. Scrape it all into a pot, add broth, heat, serve sprinkled with Parmesan… this, paired with the swift brevity of convenience will escalate leftover soup to a 5 spoon dinner.

Ramen Salad Soup ft. Hunnộy Chicken

ramensaladsoup

In my pantry today:

  • 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • marinade (below)
  • soup (below)
  • 1 handful of ramen noodles
  • 1 c kale
  • 1/3 c shredded cabbage
  • 1/3 c shredded carrot
  • 3 drops sesame oil
  • 2 spritzes olive oil cooking spray
  • some water

Hunnộy Marinade:

  • 1/4 c soy sauce
  • 1/3 c red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp garlic paste
  • 1/2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/4 tsp red hot chili powder
ramen

I am mindful that this recipe mixes some ingredients and methodologies common to very separate Asian countries.

Marinate your uncut (other than extraneous fat trimming — go to town with that part while remaining true to your own taste for extraneous fat) breasts in the above mixture in a sealed plastic bag or tupperware container and let it soak overnight, or all day or any arbitrary set of several consecutive hours you like. It’ll help things along tomorrow (or later) if you go ahead and prep the other stuff, too. Nearly mince your kale and massage a drop or two of sesame oil into it; let that sit untouched for no less than fifteen minutes, and no more than a couple days (kale is hearty). Slice a thin round or two from a split cabbage* and grate some carrots; put in a baggie and into the fridge. And, really, making the broth would cut down the chicken/noodle timing issue so go ahead and do that (at least a little in) advance of the other stuff.

Soup:

  • 3 14.5 oz cans chicken broth
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 2 drops sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp ginger garlic paste
  • 1 tsp garlic paste
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp red hot chili powder

I mean, you don’t have to do all of this the day before (although the meat would most benefit). Whenever you do make the soup, season but don’t bring it to a full boil until it’s time to boil the noodles.

When it’s time to cook the chicken, preheat a pan to M/MH. When hot, spray with olive oil cooking spray and slide a shaken wedge of animal into the pan. Spoon a little of the marinade over each. Let cook (slide it around so it doesn’t stick) on that side for 2-5 minutes or until chicken shows a white-to-pink gradient when viewed from the side, flip and let the other side cook in the same fashion. Add little drops of water/marinade respectively to keep caramelization or sticking to happen. After gradient shows same range on this side, drop 1/4 c water into the pan, cover it and reduce heat to ML for 10 minutes. Now is the time to start your noodles: bring the soup to a low boil then split the ramen in half before throwing into the pot so that they fit into said pot; stir. Return to chicken (assuming the right amount of time has passed) and slice each breast as thinly as possible. Put slices back into pan and coat with the thick marinade leavings. When noodles are done, don’t drain but divide the pot contents between two large bowls. Layer on kale, cabbage, chicken and carrots. While this did end up being a little more work than for which I’ve trained myself, it delivered spicy cold weather deliciousness at 5 spoons.

 

 

cabbagepeas*All that cabbage I made the other day was divided in half, and respectively: frozen and with peas over Basmati rice at 4 spoons (that cabbage is GOOD after sitting in the fridge a day). The rest of this same head cabbage is chilling in freezer purgatory, and a smidge bit of it still lives in a tiny plastic home in the fridge. Cabbage: one if the cheapest vegetables may also be its heartiest.

Naked Stew

In my pantry today:

  • 1 can chicken breast
  • 1 can corn
  • 1 can white beans
  • 1 can cream of chicken soup
  • 1/2 can white potatoes, quartered
  • 3/4 c small cauliflower florets
  • 2 c vegetable broth
  • 1/2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 1/2 large yellow onion, minced into near-paste
  • 3 large cloves garlic, minced into near-paste
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp red hot chiil powder
  • 2 tsp coriander
  • pinch asafoetida

nakedsoupThe hardest thing to do here was mince the garlic and onion into a near paste-like consistency, but even that was more patience than skill, and to be perfectly honest opening all the cans might’ve actually been more difficult. Either way, this stove-top stew is an easy way to wile away a winter witching hour.

Start your minced garlic and onion in a pan on ML that already hosts your melted ghee/oil. Turn the temperature almost up to M and let it sit, stirred, for a few minutes while you open all those cans and drain/rinse everything in them. Go back to the stove and sprinkle in the asafoetida, turmeric and half of your coriander. Mix well and add chicken. Mix again until all the chunks are broken up and everything is covered in the pan contents; add cauliflower and let simmer on ML for just a minute or two, then add cream of chicken soup. Mix, begin slowly adding broth as you stir in each subsequent can of stuff. Add the rest of your coriander and the red hot chili powder and keep on stirring while you slowly increase the heat to M/M-H until everything comes to a slow boil. At this point, reduce heat to L, cover and let cook until the cauliflower is tender. The only think keeping this from being more than a 4 spoon dish is that I would prefer fresh over canned anything if given my druthers.

Comfort Soup (Or, “Three Animals Walked Into a Crock Pot…”)

In my pantry today:

  • 1/2 c lentils
  • 5oz canned chicken breast
  • 2 medium potatoes
  • 1c celery, sliced
  • 1c carrots, sliced
  • 3c kale, finely minced
  • 1 tbsp sausage grease
  • 1 large onion, thin-ish slices
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 5c broth (I used vegetable despite the meaty base)
  • 1/2 c half and half
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida

So it’s chilly, the wife is home sick and I’m not feeling too spunky, myself. It feels like soup time; not just any soup time, mind you — it’s comfort soup time. Start the onions and garlic out in the sausage grease… in the crock pot. Turn it on MH, stir and let sit for an hour or so. Turn off. Run those two godforsaken errands you don’t really want to have to drag your ass out of bed to do. Come back. Assemble!

Turn the crock pot back on to MH Stir in sliced carrots and celery. Cut potatoes into bite-size chunks and stir into the mess. And what the heck — drain that little can of chicken sitting in the cupboard and toss it in. Sprinkle on and stir in all the seasonings so that all of the soup bits are well-coated in the glory of flavor. Then enter your broth. After the first cup or two, stir in the lentils. Begin folding in little fistfuls of kale, alternating with the remainder of the broth. Bless the entire stew with half and half, cover, and let cook on M-MH until the potatoes are soft. All of the comfort of a hearty, stick-to-your-ribs soup with all of the vegetative nutrition of a salad bar — you’ll need all 5 spoons for this pot!

Blood-n-Guts Halloween Soup

In my pantry today:

  • 3 c cooked red cabbage (freezer storage shout-out!)
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 1 can petite diced tomatoes
  • 1 can corn
  • 1 can green beans
  • 64oz broth (I kept this vegan with vegetable, but any animal will do)
  • 2 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida

‘Tis near-about the season for drinking blood and eating guts without having to apologize for it! This one is easy and can be eaten in so many ways once settled in the crock pot — the 6 quarts of soup this recipe makes is great for freezing whatever you can’t eat after a day or three. Take my word, however that this won’t need to get punishing for a few consecutive meals. A very basic vegetable soup is like a basic black dress —  it’s easy to dress up or down.

As it is this soup is a pretty rainbow of nutrition in its formative stages, then after a while the anthocyanins will turn the entire shebang into a spooky crime scene photo. See those ingredients up there? Put them all in a crock pot, set it to whenever you want a frightfully good dinner (but give it at least 4 hours to coalesce; the longer it sits, the darker the red).

Last night, we enjoyed ate our bloody slop topped with thin slices of asiago cheese and garlic breadsticks. It was very definitely 5 spoons… of DARKNESS! (moihahaha, et al)

Leftover Soup: Springtime Edition

In my pantry today:

Whatever you didn’t eat off the hen the other day needs to go, bones ‘n all, into a large stock pot with enough water to barely cover and 1 tbsp salt. Bring to a boil on MH then reduce heat to ML and let cook all day… then you’ve got two main options: let it cool and pick out all the bones, or at the end of the night put it into the fridge because you’ve got no time to pick the carcass clean and also make sure the dishes are out of the sink but oh god first you’ve got to unload the dishwasher and its late so maybe tomorrow.  I chose the latter.

So today I warmed the pot a little, strained out the broth (set aside) and picked the carcass clean. Put picked meat (I had about 1c) with the previously-vegetarian lentil dish; bring 2-2.5 c of the broth (you should have about 4c left to freeze) to a boil on MH and, once rolling, turn heat to L and add the solids. Serve over room-temperature rice; since it’s fully cooked, don’t mix it in prior to serving or risk a bowl of swollen snooge — the broth will heat it. 5 spoons! I am just about drained of my own (spoons, that is), and this was a great way to make a delicious chilly weather meal that’s full of nutrients (phyto- and otherwise) and the Don’tYouWasteMe fridge gang. The only way this could’ve ended up more Smack Yo Mama good is with the addition of cayenne or hot red chili powder.

Spring Snap Soup (& Cheese Quesadillas)

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c leftover hibachi rice
  • 1 15 oz can snaps-n-peas
  • 3 c vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 2 tbsp diced onion
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 1/4 c diced roma tomato
  • 1 tbsp fresh cilantro
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp asafoetida

Well, hello tonight’s low of 44° in April! I generally swear by the delineation between “soup weather” and “salad weather,” but every now and then things happen in this world that we (as not-meteorologists) cannot explain. Just when I was bemoaning the first day of the year to hit 90° along comes one week later, and I am glut with the fast food that extra-routinized variables bring even after two days of Norovirus‘ enforced foodlessness. All current conditions point to a forecast of soup!

The post ratio of the last week and shameful public admittance to eating too much fast food should tell all of you junior detectives this: leftovers. Crap, leftovers. Start some ghee melting in a pot on M while you first being pulling various things out of the fridge. Throw in those leftover diced onions from the bacon tacos and after a minute or two, toss in the also taco-leftover tomatoes and garlic paste. Swirl. Open, rinse and rain your snap peas and add them to the pot. Sprinkle on your remaining seasonings and stir. Add broth, stir, add rice, stir, add uncut cilantro leaves, stir. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to L and serve before your rice swells up and kills the mood.

For leftovers, applaud! This is an easy 4 spoons of soup, and will be served alongside tiny quesadillas made from taco night’s three leftover rounds.