Tag Archives: vegetable broth

Spicy Peanut Stew

In my pantry today:

  • 1 lg sweet potato in 1-2″ chunks
  • 1 14 oz can black beans
  • 1 tbsp grapeseed oil (Olive is totes fine too)
  • 1 c minced onion
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1 celery stalk in 1/2″-1″ bits
  • 3/4 c frozen corn
  • 1/2 c minced kale
  • 1/2 c creamy peanut butter
  • 1 14 oz can diced/crushed tomatoes w/ green chile
  • 1-2 c vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp ginger powder
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (or to taste)
  • 1/8 tsp sea salt
  • dash of asafoetida

peanut-stewIt’s a strange winter that’s seen a lot of beautiful spring days and a few notably polar ones. If it’s going to be cold any particular evening, a soup or stew is what to have on the stove. Not to get all June Cleaver on y’alls tails, but I love knowing something will be ready the minute my darling returns from a long day of work. Stews’ll let you have that. Tonight I’m trying a West African-inspired peanut stew that made friends with the inside of my cupboard.

120507061131-tv-mom-june-cleaver-barbara-billingsley-horizontal-gallery

RIP, Barbara Billingsly

When your oil in a large pot reaches the high side of medium-low, add your seasonings to the oil and mix it into a paste. Then mix in the kale onion, garlic and celery. Let that cook for 5-10 minutes, and upon your return add the tomatoes peanut butter, stirring it in until smooth. Add the can of beans (liquid ‘n all) and as much broth as your taste permits. Put diced sweet potato in pot and let it come to a leisurely boil on M before covering it, turning the burner to L and walking away until your sweet potatoes are tender (At least 45 minutes).

This is a gluten-free and vegan recipe, but… wait, come back! You didn’t let me finish.

This is a gluten-free and vegan recipe, but use chicken instead of vegetable broth or, heck, add actual chicken and you’ve got an inarguably good dinner at 5 spoons.

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Creamy Kale-fredo

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c mezze penne pasta
  • 1 c minced, marinated* kale
  • 1/2 c cashew butter
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1.5 c chicken broth (for equitable option, use veggie broth)
  • 2 tbsp Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1/4 tsp oregano
  • dash turmeric

kalefredoAll the creaminess of an Alfredo with none of the cream! This is not to say I was gunning for an Alfredo sauce when I started, but the richness and flavor reaped by cashew butter is a worthy replacement for actual cream. Start this whole shebang by mincing your garlic and letting it simmer in a pot on M for a few minutes (I washed dishes).

Upon your return to the stove, smack the cashew butter up in that pot. Add broth slowly; stir to meld the two. Heck, go on and stir in all the seasonings while you’re at it. Once everything has made friends with one another, introduce the lemon juice and kale; cover and simmer on L for a few minutes while you cook the pasta. Drain it and add to the sauce pot. Toss everything together and let it sit on L for at least 5m (let the pasta saturate itself in flavortown) before digging in. 5 spoons!

kale*The equation I use for making marinated kale is: KALE (- STEMS + A FEW DROPS OIL) + FOOD PROCESSOR x 15 MINUTE WAIT = “MARINATED” KALE

The Lo Mein Course

In my pantry today:

  • 2 c leftover vermicelli, cold
  • 2 c broccoli florets
  • 6-10 baby carrots, quartered
  • 1 c vegetable broth
  • 1/3 c red cabbage, diced
  • 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 green onion
  • 1 tbsp sweet onion, sliced thin
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced thin/minced
  • 4 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • dash asafoetida

P1100374I don’t generally order lo mein when take out is afoot… dumplings and other fried things are my vice; I could make a meal easily out of everything on the Appetizer menu at most Chinese restaurants. This is to say that I am no expert on Asian cuisine (as I just used Americanized Chinese take-out as my primary example of Asian cuisine), but it can’t hurt to start with garlic and two kinds of onion in oil on L for an hour. This will deliver plenty of prep and clean-up-from-prep time.

When your time is right, put 1 tsp of olive oil in the bottom of a stock pot (or use a big pan if you’re fancy, but I make messes) and turn to MH. When the highest MH is reached, toss in your vegetables and stir fry for a few seconds. Pour broth into the pot, add seasonings and 3 tsp soy sauce. Stir then cover when boiling happens and reduce heat to ML. Let the vegetables cook in the flavored broth until fork-tender (about 5-10m).

While that’s going on, pour room temperature vermicelli into the pan with oil, garlic and onions. Mix well. Remove the stock pot from heat and mix in noodles. Once there’s a successful consummation cover the pot and let it sit for 3-5m. A hearty 5 spoons await.

 

Moong-day, Moong-day (ft. Nutty Cabbage)

In my pantry today:

  • 1/2 medium cabbage
  • 1/3 c moong dal
  • 1/3 c dry roasted peanuts
  • 1 c Basmati rice, cooked/cold
  • 1 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 3 c vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp garlic paste
  • 2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tbsp hot curry powder 
  • 1 pinch asafoetida

peanutcabbage

I’ve got to come clean about something.

I really like cabbage.

Cannot lie. Like it, prefer it even over other vegetables. This all came to pass long before I understood its health benefits beyond not being cake. Want to improve your health but can’t afford another prescription? Eat cruciferous vegetables. That being said…

Start the ghee out on ML and when melted add the onion. Cook over ML heat for 10m or so then toss in the raw cabbage. Turn up heat to MH and stir fry for a minute or two; add 1/2 c of broth and cover. Continue letting steam over M heat for another 10 minutes. Remove lid and stir in seasonings, peanuts. Bring back to a boil and stir in moong with remainder of broth. Bring back to a boil and let cook on M until moong is tender (20-30m) and most of the liquid is gone. Remove from heat and toss in cold rice. Put back on ML heat and toss until everything is hot. Maybe this looks like it takes forever, but there were a lot of dishes to wash ‘n junk and it seemed to take no time at all (and precious little effort). As a combined nut lover and one who loves cabbage done its due, I give this 5 spoons!

The Shepherd with a Moral Objection to Meat

In my pantry today:

  • 1/2 c Nutrela, dry
  • 2 M Russet potatoes
  • 1/2 M sweet yellow onion
  • 3 L cloves garlic
  • 1/4 c whole wheat flour
  • 1.25 c vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp tomato sauce
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 3/4 c frozen peas
  • 6ish baby carrots
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 pinch asafoetida
  • 2 tbsp sharp cheddar, shredded

shepherdsvegetarianpieThis might’ve ended up being a full-on vegan recipe, but in an effort to ensure that my first experience with Nutrela wasn’t assuredly terrible (it’s easier to be assuredly terrible if it’s unfamiliar) I employed the assistance of butter and cheese. To be fair, I was wicked excited to see a non-meat protein that touted such an excellent black and white side-label (see below) for $1.99. And that’s not $1.99 a serving, it’s for an entire box with several meals slated. I really wanted this to work, and I will let you know up front that it was a relatively good experiment despite using primarily dairy fats in lieu of my normal heavy-handed seasoning.

nutrelaStart by preparing your Nutella… crap, Nutrela… according to box instructions.  When cooked and drained and then squeezed for excess moisture (because it will be in excess), set aside and go about doing the things with which you are familiar.

I sliced the garlic and onion thin, then minced it like I could give a shit and added it to the melted butter on L-ML. Stir in turmeric and let the whole mess saute in golden glory while for about ten minutes. I like to leave the skins on my potatoes for both ease and potential nutrients; slice and boil them until soft. 5-10m before they’re ready to drain/mash, throw the baby carrots in with the boiling water. When you drain the potatoes, just pick them out before mashing happens and set them aside.

nutrela2Now your garlic and onion should be ready to push to one side and fork-smash (I couldn’t find the whisk) whole wheat flour into. Mix in the tomato sauce and other seasonings. Make a paste then begin adding in broth. When everything is thick and gravy-y, add in Nutrela then stir in peas and sliced baby carrots. Remove from heat and pour into a glass baking dish. Fork-smash those taters and layer that on top. But not really on the top-top because you will also decide to toss on a sprinkle of cheese in one last silent prayer to the Not Sucking Gods. Bake at 400° for 20m or until cheese begins to brown. I believe I can do better with Nutrela, but believing even that means a huge success just happened — make sure you get it boiled to a texture you like, then pull out 4 spoons!

 

Cheddar Chicken Pie with Broccoli Sentinels (is Only Platonic Friends with the Curry Cabbage)

In my pantry today:

  • 1 frozen, unbaked pie shell
  • 1 can chicken breast, drained and rinsed
  • 2 c large broccoli florets
  • 2/3 c cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 “roasted chicken” flavored gravy packet
  • 1/2 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 3/4 c vegetable broth
  • 1/2 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 c minced onion, minced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • pinch asafoetida

I have had so. much. pie. this holiday season. It really is kind of ridiculous how pies culminate for an annual winter slaughter of the human diet and pride: pecan, caramel apple cheesecake, plain cheesecake with a mandarin orange pie winning the pie-ze this year for both deliciousness and moxie. After rounding out the last family jaunt yesterday with a pizza, I feel it is safe to start officially distancing myself from rich meals and desserts that do nothing but inadvertently complicate my health and/or well-being.

That being said, I made a pie for dinner tonight. Don’t you judge me.

In the freezer still lived the other half of a crust two-set I’d gotten on sale, canned chicken in the cupboard and cheese in the fridge. Oh, and fresh broccoli; that’s probably the healthiest and therefore most important part of things. Before you get to arranging health around the edge of your pie, start your onion and garlic in butter heating to M. After five or so minutes of making sure everything gets coated and tossed, add the turmeric and asafoetida; stir. While that’s being perpetrated drain and rinse the can of chicken and mix your gravy packet with almond milk. Add eggs to this mixture one at a time and whisk until blended. Return to the stove and stir in 1/3 c of broth and the chicken; toss everything together and spoon into the pie crust. Add the remainder of broth to the egg/gravy mixture. Arrange chunky florets around the edges and secure it all with a pour-over of casserole gravy. Bake in a 375° oven for 45 minutes, remove to sprinkle 1/3 c cheddar over and into the florets and continue baking until a knife comes out of the middle clean. And because I made this earlier today in advance of dinnertime, when I warm it back up at 35o° for 10m I will have sprinkled on another 1/3 c cheddar. This ended up being delicious in flavor, but a little unsatisfactory to me in consistency… then again, the bottom crust I found too soggy was forked off my plate and eaten by my wife. Still, my conscience tells me to go with just 3 spoons on this.

Also, while making that I had also started some cabbage that’s been waiting patiently in the fridge. I don’t know what I’m going to do with it yet — I don’t want to take the easy way out by throwing it into broth and declaring a soup; I’ve got plenty of that in the freezer right now. No, I want this cabbage to go places, travel the world and be better than freezer soup:

  • 1 medium head cabbage
  • 1/2 c onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1-2 c vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp vegetable ghee
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1.5 tbsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp hot curry powder
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/8 tsp asafoetida

cabbageThis one’s easy. Start the mustard seeds out in a ghee-oiled pot heating to M. When it’s near full heat, add the onion and garlic. When the seeds start snapping, add the spices and stir into a pasty mess. Add a dash of broth. Add cabbage in by little handfuls, all the while mixing and adding broth as needed to get everything spiced right proper. Add enough broth to cover the pan bottom, then put a lid on it and dial the heat down to the L side of ML. I cannot yet give this spoons because I do not feel it is yet a finished product. Good luck to my imagination!

 

Leftover Roast Beef Travels South of the Border

In my pantry today:

  • 1.5 c sliced roast beef, cut into chunks
  • 1 14 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1-1.5 c vegetable broth
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 c minced yellow onion
  • 1/2 lime, wedged
  • 4 tsp Taco Seasoning ganked from a boxed taco kit in the cupboard
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • pinch asafoetida

leftoverroastbeefSo I wasn’t even really planning at its onset to write about what I assumed would be a boring, last-minute meal. I was under the MS weather yesterday and have no idea from whence this amazing creation came. Thanks have to go to my dad’s amazing 14lb roast beef — nothing would have ended up this tasty without it. I cut up about 1/2 of the leftovers he sent us home with, stuck the other half in the freezer then took a step back and regarded the pile of meat on the counter before me. We love Indian food, but obviously there really aren’t a lot of recipes there including cow. I had no way to make gravy and not enough of the ingredients needed to throw together a Thai salad. The options here were limited — but there was cooked rice in the fridge and beans in the cupboard!

Start out the same way I always do — garlic and onion in oil warming to M. Just before it gets to full on M, reduce the heat to ML and let cook for about ten minutes while you cut up the roast beef, drain/rinse the beans and then, say, empty the dishwasher. When you return to the pan dust in your seasonings and mix everything into a paste; scrape the bottom clean as you do this, adding in little drips of broth to help the process. Add in beans; when coated completely, add in broth little by little until beans are halfway covered. Turn heat to M as you do this until near-boiling. Top with diced roast beef and lime. Turn heat back to ML and cover pot; walk away for 5-10m while the limes cook onto things. Come back, remove limes and mix meat into broth, adding enough more to nearly cover things now. Bring to a low boil on M then reduce to MreallyL for a few hours, checking in once or twice to make sure all the meat remains covered in liquid. The meat ended up getting much more tender and flavoring the vegetable broth with the black beans and lime to come out in its own gravy. This was a lick-the-bowl good meal over rice and earned every one of its 5 spoons!

 

 

Comfort in Chaos (or, “When CAN’T Potatoes Fix the World?”)

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c cooked white beans
  • 1 medium baking potato
  • 1/2 c quinoa
  • 2 14.5 oz can vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp safflower oil
  • 1 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 1 large yellow onion
  • 1 tsp corn starch
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp garlic paste
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric

I can’t find my camera. This is taken using a cell phone. Don’t you judge me.

There is a heckuvalot going on right now. The new floors make our entire downstairs feel like a new house into which we are moving fresh, and moving into anywhere requires a great deal of work. Meals have been consisting largely of prepackaged dinners from the Indian grocery, sweet potatoes roasted in advance, bananas and coffee. Lots of coffee. I’ve gone a week without any episodes (of my MS exacerbation) and I’ve gotten a new prescription called in for more Neurontin (eyeball seizures cannot prevent me from editing css style sheets!). So there, life. Suck on that.

Start this meal in your most favoritest way — mincing fresh garlic and onion. Put in pan heating to M with oil and ghee and let it come to and stay at full heat for  and seasonings; stir. 2-3m with vigorous spatula attention. Add 1/4″ slices of potato and all of your seasonings; stir. Let come to a boil on MH then reduce heat to M and walk away for 15m. Upon return, add another can of broth mixed with corn starch. Fold in cooked beans, bring everything back to a boil on M. Stir in 1/2 c quinoa then reduce heat to L and let simmer until eatin’ time. 5 spoons!

Lazarus Carrots (or, “Not Just Noses for Snowmen”)

In my pantry today:

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 gloves garlic
  • 1 small Vidalia onion
  • 6 carrots (2.5 c ground)
  • 1 tbsp mustard seed
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp cardamom
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/4 c ground flax
  • 2 14.5 oz can vegetable broth
  • .5 c water
  • 1.5 c cooked Basmati rice
  • .5 c cooked barley

I’ve been intending to roast all of those gorgeous carrots from my CSA with potatoes and onions and such… but at 3 weeks of good intentions, I am paving the road to hell with now-wilty carrots. I must put them to some manner of delicious use… perhaps by shoving their diced asses into the food processor: the phoenix-maker of iffy food!

While your carrots process to a nice mincemeat, start your onion, garlic and mustard seeds out in the coconut oil in a cold pan warming to M. When the mustard seeds begin popping, mix in turmeric and remove from heat. Transfer carrots from the food processor to a bowl and mix in flax; set aside. Pour cooled-ish pan contents into the processor and puree until a sauce-ish consistency. Put back in pan (now on ML) and stir in carrot/flax mixture and the remainder of your seasonings with 1 c water and bring to a low boil. Transfer immediately to the food processor and smoosh it all together one last time.

Transfer back to pan and slowly mix in 1/2 can of broth. Bring to an easy boil on ML for 10-15m. Mix in dal and another 1/2 can of broth and bring it all to a low boil on M. Let boil uncovered on M for 20-30 minutes, adding more broth in stages when it seems your sauce is becoming dangerously thick. Give your cooked rice and barley a proper introduction and serve underneath a sauce fit for a king. The sweetness of the carrots is heartened by that of the vidalia and the savory garlic and garam masala. Even wilty carrots can be made delectable with the right care — 5 spoons!

Daliciousness

In my pantry today:

  • 1.25 c moong dal
  • 3 medium-large red potatoes
  • 2 leaves of kale, minced
  • 1/2 large red onion
  • 1 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 14.5 oz cans vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp garlic paste
  • 1.5 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 2 tsp asafoetida

What’s a great animal-free meat substitute when there’s no tofu and no beans have been soaked? Dal! Moong dal can be cooked in 10m at a boil, so when the mood for a comfort-style meal hits too late to arrange a primary protein, these little orange beads can wink their collective eye. Or maybe not, because if they could wink then they would be coming from some kind of animal and I’m really trying here, guys.

Start the big deep-bottomed frying pan out on cold M with ghee, and when at full M (with the ghee having dissolved into tears at the hellfire below it) toss in the chunks of onion. Stir for just a moment, then add your thinly-sliced chunks of potato. Put in the garlic paste and stir until everything is coated. Add the almond milk, stir then sprinkle kale on top and cover. Let it come to a boil for about 5m, then return to add seasonings and grieve for that blisteringly gorgeous green on the kale that won’t last until chewing. Stir, then add the vegetable broth. Cover and let return to a boil on MH. Go take a load off.

It’s important to note that I cooked my moong dal beforehand, but they could probably be put in the big pan at this point. Oh well. I just added them after the potatoes were soft, and no flavor factors seemed tested. In fact, the ultimate judging of this dish was no test a-tall: 4 spoons.