Tag Archives: Vidalia onion

Sweet — and Savory — Potatoes

 

In my pantry today:

  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 1 medium Vidalia onion
  • 1/4 c quinoa
  • 2-2.5 c broth (vegetable here)
  • 1 tbsp vegetable ghee
  • 1/4 c blackberry preserves
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp kala jeera
  • 1 tsp hot curry powder
  • 1 tsp ginger garlic paste
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon

First thing’s first — slice your onion moderately thinly and start it out in ghee that’s mostly melted and in a pan on M. Cook onions over ML heat for about 5m. Dice your sweet potato — skin and all — and add it into pan. Stir in the remainder of seasonings and preserves then add enough broth to cover everything and bring to a boil. Cover and let cook over ML heat until potatoes are fork-tender. At this point, stir in quinoa and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to L for about 20m. Ring the dinner bell — 4 spoons!

 

Whatchoo Palak’n About?

In my pantry today:

  • 1 c leftover Basmati rice
  • 1 c cooked quinoa
  • 3 c chpped fresh spinach
  • 1 medium Vidalia onion
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • 1 14.5 oz can petite diced tomatoes, drained
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tbsp madras curry powder
  • 1/2 tsp cardamon
  • 1/2 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida

Ok, so this one’s pretty ugly too. Lets face it — most “sauce on rice” dishes, regardless of their flavor, can get a bit visually boring. This did start out, however, as a splendid phyonutrient calendar girl. Nothing’s pretty out of the food processor, so don’t you judge this little lady.

Start your onion, garlic and mustard seeds heating to M in ghee. Once the first crackle is heard from your mustard seeds, add the kala jeera and chopped spinach. Continue tossing the goods on M until your spinach begins to wilt. Add the drained tomatoes, mix, then let them all live together in a commandeering food processor for 5-10m. Halfway through the processing, add the remainder of your seasonings and turn it back on. When it’s at a consistency you like, pour back into a pot and keep on L until dinner. Mix your leftover rice with the half batch of quinoa you cooked just now and serve your sauce over it. Ring your plate with naan quarters. 4 spoons!

 

 

 

 

Cashew-Kale Ramen Bowls

In my pantry today

  • Ramen noodles
  • 2 c red Russian kale, stems removed
  • 1 white radish
  • 1/4 large Vidalia onion
  • 2 c vegetable broth
  • 1 packet Swanson® FlavorBoost / 1 c water
  • 1.5 tsp soy sauce
  • 1.5 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp Good Seasoning® dressing mix
  • 1  tsp garlic
  • 1 tsp red hot chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp asafoetida

In a bowl with sides large enough to suggest privacy for its innards, take 1/2 tsp soy sauce and give your bite-size cuts of kale a tender deep tissue massage. Add thinly-sliced radish and onion and toss everything together so as to ensure the two tagalongs don’t get jealous on missing out on that massage (I mean, I know I’d be). Put the mix in the fridge to sit for at least 15m. Mine went several hours, only to its benefit.

In an appropriately-sized vessel, combine the remainder of your soy sauce with 1 tsp garlic, 1/2 tsp turmeric, Good Seasonings®, water and chili powder. Bring to a boil then let simmer on L until mealtime.

Then upon the time of the dining, remove kale mix from the fridge to bring it to room temperature. Bring broth back to a boil and sink in your ramen. Let boil for 4m, then pour their al dente selves along with their broth into a bowl (the noodles will finish cooking there in just a minute or two while its too hot to eat anyway). Top with the kale-onion-radish mix that’s been marinating (in my case, all day), then top that with the cashews you took out of the food processor a third of the way through becoming cashew butter. The soup was flavorful and very spicy; the ground cashews were just sweet and rich enough to complement the heat beyond my expectations. And I’ve never before known radishes to be anything other than salad bar passovers. This was unexpectedly good!  5 spoons!