Tag Archives: vidalia

Lazarus Carrots (or, “Not Just Noses for Snowmen”)

In my pantry today:

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 gloves garlic
  • 1 small Vidalia onion
  • 6 carrots (2.5 c ground)
  • 1 tbsp mustard seed
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp cardamom
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp hot red chili powder
  • 1/4 c ground flax
  • 2 14.5 oz can vegetable broth
  • .5 c water
  • 1.5 c cooked Basmati rice
  • .5 c cooked barley

I’ve been intending to roast all of those gorgeous carrots from my CSA with potatoes and onions and such… but at 3 weeks of good intentions, I am paving the road to hell with now-wilty carrots. I must put them to some manner of delicious use… perhaps by shoving their diced asses into the food processor: the phoenix-maker of iffy food!

While your carrots process to a nice mincemeat, start your onion, garlic and mustard seeds out in the coconut oil in a cold pan warming to M. When the mustard seeds begin popping, mix in turmeric and remove from heat. Transfer carrots from the food processor to a bowl and mix in flax; set aside. Pour cooled-ish pan contents into the processor and puree until a sauce-ish consistency. Put back in pan (now on ML) and stir in carrot/flax mixture and the remainder of your seasonings with 1 c water and bring to a low boil. Transfer immediately to the food processor and smoosh it all together one last time.

Transfer back to pan and slowly mix in 1/2 can of broth. Bring to an easy boil on ML for 10-15m. Mix in dal and another 1/2 can of broth and bring it all to a low boil on M. Let boil uncovered on M for 20-30 minutes, adding more broth in stages when it seems your sauce is becoming dangerously thick. Give your cooked rice and barley a proper introduction and serve underneath a sauce fit for a king. The sweetness of the carrots is heartened by that of the vidalia and the savory garlic and garam masala. Even wilty carrots can be made delectable with the right care — 5 spoons!

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Double Feature: Basil, Beets and Barley (or, “Wait, That’s Three Things.”)

In my pantry today:

  • 5 small beets, baked and peeled
  • 3 c cooked barley
  • 1 c goat cheese
  • 2 large cloves garlic
  • 1 c fresh basil
  • 1 c fresh spinach
  • 1/2 c radish microgreens
  • 1 tbsp salted butter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 6-8 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 small Vidalia onion

I think I’m finally getting the hang of our CSA weekly bundles. I’ve got four days until the next pickup and only 1 tomato, 1 head of kale, 5 beets and 7 carrots left before Tuesday. This is a vast improvement over weeks prior, and I’ve yet to determine if this pace has worked. Check back after Tuesday.

I’ve also been hemming and hawing about the beets a little — they’re a new and foreign element to my kitchen, but I remind myself that that is not their fault. They may be the poor and huddled masses in my crisper drawer now, but social justice will catch up… hopefully riding the iron horse of deliciousness. I apparently made a 5 spoon issue out of it yesterday, sources report. Mince 4-6 (depending on size, y’know) cloves of garlic and 1/2 c basil in as teeny-tiny flakes as possible. Cream it with 1/2 c goat cheese and apply in neat balls to the top of chilled beet slices. I salt roasted these beets day before yesterday — cut off and reserve the greens, scrub the roots and place in a glass baking dish with a 1/2″ of salt in the bottom. Cover the dish and bake at 425° for 45 minutes to an hour. Let cool, peel and refrigerate for future beet use.

While you’ve got the garlic-mincing going, go ahead and dice up 2-4 cloves and 1/2 a Vidalia onion. Start your butter and oil warming to M in a cold pan with the garlic and onion. Once it reaches full heat, reduce to L and let cook for 15m or so — until your garlic crisps to golden brown and your onions are near caramelization. Using a slotted spatula or spoon, remove the crispy garlic and sweet onion; set aside. Return heat to M and mix in your barley. Once it’s well-coated, add your mixture of spinach, chopped basil and microgreens. Toss until the spinach becomes bright green, then add back the garlic and onion and continue mixing with a pinch or two of sea salt. When everything is warm together, add dollops of goat cheese and cover the pan. Serve in 5m. The onions will deliver sweet bites in the midst of garlic’s tasty reign, and goat cheese will apply a creamy reasoning to the entire argument. 5 spoons.

Freshmaker for Two (or, “Not Every Salad Deserves a Post, but…”)

In my pantry today:

  • 3 c chopped fresh spinach
  • 2 c chopped fresh arugula
  • 1 c “zesty mix” microgreens
  • 1 sliced roma tomato
  • 1/2 sliced avocado
  • 2 tbsp Vidalia onion
  • 1 tbsp golden raisins
  • 2 tbsp dried cherries
  • 2 tbsp chopped walnuts
  • 1 tbsp feta cheese
  • 1/4 c homemade vinaigrette

Summer is near-upon us. I make a lot of salads in the summer. Now I will need to make a lot of salads with consciously varied creative interest for any and all who might Stumbleupon my blog. It seems like it would be hard to not get tired of salads, no? Right now I’ve got the CSA on my side with different weekly deliveries of glorious salad (and other!) potential. I am going to use it to my advantage tonight; it’s been a long day wherein I had to pay someone to tell me that I drank too much coffee. Instead of spending time in my kitchen I sat in waiting rooms without coffee. To be told that I drank too much coffee.

It’s true, it’s true; I just can’t believe I had to give what I saved yesterday on not needing new brakes instead to an Urgent Care. Who’s got two thumbs, one stomach fire and no health insurance? This dumb girl.

Seeing as how my afternoon was wasted, both in time and amount of coffee consumed, dinner had to be something easy… and salads, well, are pretty handy. If you do them right. If you don’t, you’ll be hungry an hour later and wishing you’d just ordered Chinese for the same payoff. The common misconception about salads is that they cannot be made a meal unless some manner of hot, delicious animal adorns their top. Not true. Just make sure you’re including ingredients that make up for the protein you might otherwise lack, and, hey guess what — vegetables have protein! There’ll be small quantities in the spinach and microgreens, a little more in the avocado and a good deal more in the feta and walnuts. There will be enough, via the combination of everything above, to make a hearty salad that rivals anything a “meat and three sides” plate could deliver. I always feel better about the choice I’d made for dinner after a good salad, and tonight’s was beyond the need for any exception: 4 spoons!

Sausage Curry (or, “No, Fergie’s Not Coming”)

In my pantry today:

  • 1/3 c ground sausage
  • 1/2 c red Russian kale
  • 1 c arugula
  • 1 medium Vidalia onion
  • 1 small tomato
  • 1/2 c vegetable broth
  • 1 15 oz can petite diced tomatoes
  • 1 c black eyed peas
  • 1/2 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp red hot chili powder
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1.5 tbsp hot curry powder

Start your sausage in a pan on ML and slowly increase the heat as it begins to cook; stab it with the spatula until the meat is as crumbly as you like. Drain all grease from the meat and set that crumbled goodness aside. Leave grease to cook your diced onion.

When the onion begins to blush translucence, add the kale and arugula and use it as a dishrag to sop up whatever grease is left. Toss in your tomato for good measure and sprinkle 1 tsp of garlic powder. Once everything is well acquainted, pour the mess into a food processor and puree until only tiny flecks of color remain. When you pause to scrape the sides of the processor add the rest of your seasonings. You will be rewarded with a fine rainbowish mush, so pour it all back into the pan and add the can of tomatoes. Stir in the beans and crumbled sausage, slowly adding the broth (I had vegetable on hand, but please feel free to use the juice of any animal or plant you like here). Let simmer on L for at least an hour, then serve over rice or with penne pasta or… well, you’ve probably got it from here, right? 4 spoons!