Tag Archives: yellow curry powder

Daliciousness

In my pantry today:

  • 1.25 c moong dal
  • 3 medium-large red potatoes
  • 2 leaves of kale, minced
  • 1/2 large red onion
  • 1 c unsweetened almond milk
  • 2 14.5 oz cans vegetable broth
  • 2 tsp garlic paste
  • 1.5 tsp vegetable ghee
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 2 tsp asafoetida

What’s a great animal-free meat substitute when there’s no tofu and no beans have been soaked? Dal! Moong dal can be cooked in 10m at a boil, so when the mood for a comfort-style meal hits too late to arrange a primary protein, these little orange beads can wink their collective eye. Or maybe not, because if they could wink then they would be coming from some kind of animal and I’m really trying here, guys.

Start the big deep-bottomed frying pan out on cold M with ghee, and when at full M (with the ghee having dissolved into tears at the hellfire below it) toss in the chunks of onion. Stir for just a moment, then add your thinly-sliced chunks of potato. Put in the garlic paste and stir until everything is coated. Add the almond milk, stir then sprinkle kale on top and cover. Let it come to a boil for about 5m, then return to add seasonings and grieve for that blisteringly gorgeous green on the kale that won’t last until chewing. Stir, then add the vegetable broth. Cover and let return to a boil on MH. Go take a load off.

It’s important to note that I cooked my moong dal beforehand, but they could probably be put in the big pan at this point. Oh well. I just added them after the potatoes were soft, and no flavor factors seemed tested. In fact, the ultimate judging of this dish was no test a-tall: 4 spoons.

Color Theory Cooking

In my pantry today:

  • 1 head kale
  • 1 head red cabbage
  • 1 c dried moong dal
  • 1 small onion
  • 1/2 c water
  • 1 16oz can petite diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic-ginger paste
  • 2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp yellow curry
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp asafoetida
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 small dried red chili pepper

This will end up being a lot less visually attractive than when it starts, but isn’t that the case with much of life anyhow? At least, here, today, it will a visual let down apologized for by great taste and nutrient fever.*

Grab a stock pot and in it put your oil, onion and mustard seeds; let that cook on M for 10-15m. That’s plenty of time to chop up your head of cabbage and to de-vein your kale. When the onions begin to brown or mustard seeds begin popping (whichever comes first) add your cabbage. Stir to coat and let cook for 5m before adding in your kale. Stir, add water, cover, reduce heat to ML. Start your moong dal to boiling. Look through your cupboards for inspiration on what to do next. Pull out a can of tomatoes and all the aforementioned seasoning devices.

After the cabbakale is a little languid and more reasonable to open discussion, add the ginger-garlic paste and garlic powder. Stir thoroughly. Add tomatoes and remainder of your seasonings (except the dried red pepper) then stir and let sit until the dal is ready.
I didn’t need to drain the beans — they cooked in a small pot and absorbed all the water into a near-oatmealesque texture which worked well with the waterier texture of the stock pot contents. Combine dal and kalbbage, crush up dried pepper and sprinkle into the two as you merge them faithfully into one. Serve over that Basmati rice you had time to make yesterday.

 

 

*”Nutrient Fever” isn’t really a thing.